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Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood Review – A Beautiful Film We’ve Seen Before

Apollo 10 1/2: A Childhood in the Space Age plays like an instructional manual for being a kid in the late sixties. by Jack Black (school of rock) the narrative is oddly flat considering the actor’s usual brilliance, but it fits a movie’s fact-listing pattern. Generally speaking, the animation will remind its fans that: A dark browser, but the flashbacks and thumbnails feature a similar but visibly different change that’s welcome. Writer-director Richard Linklater (childhood) seems obsessed with making movies about himself as a teenager, but his screenplay Apollo 10 1/2: A Childhood in the Space Age He has a number or two.

Stan (Jack Black) is an average nine-year-old boy living in Texas in his late 60s. His sister works at Baskin-Robbins, his brother mows the lawn, his father works at NASA, and so does Stan – at least for now. The “Apollo 10 1/2” has a design flaw built into its cockpit and only Stan can drive the vehicle. While this undercover mission may not deserve Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong’s acknowledgment, it still takes advantage of the heights of life. Board games, sports, Astroworld trips, watching TV and listening to records with the family are some of them.

Apollo 10 1/2: A Childhood in the Space Age Another introduction to Linklater’s two choices: a film and an animation about a young boy from the South in America during the Vietnam War. 2006s A dark browser It was revolutionary not only in its animation, but also in the story it told through animation, and with the added bonus of actors that you could see. Apollo 10 1/2: A Childhood in the Space Age It doesn’t have nearly the same storytelling, but it takes Linklater’s animation career back and forth. The best animation in the film is not in the main story but in everything else. Whenever there is a TV, flashback, skit, or anything that doesn’t match the reality of the main characters, the animation is removed. The result is a smoother texture and a more authentic vision. Compared to the rest of the film, these scenes look like paintings that move with a soft touch.

Earth comes in many forms Apollo 10 1/2: A Childhood in the Space Age. What sounds like news clips, the fantasies of a childish secret agent in space, and – most distracting of all – endless information in the voice-over format that doesn’t serve the story. Jack Black doesn’t exactly fly, but he’s not used to the best of his abilities. Aside from the actual list of things from the late ’60s and early ’70s, there’s something extremely boring about a subdued black guy. a third Apollo 10 1/2: A Childhood in the Space Age Black takes inventory of things that are not only obvious, but repetitive. If the film is set in the modern era but not the moon landing, there may be room for some time-themed context. But the audience is so grounded in the moment that any reference that isn’t Texas-specific seems out of place.

Apollo 10 1/2: A Childhood in the Space Age a fun experience but not much more. There’s no heartstrings to be pulled, and the energetic boy-astronaut plot is obstructed by ’70s references playing on repeat. It’s still great that a film like this can be made today, and die-hard Netflix animation fans as well as those who appreciate Linklater’s work will likely benefit. Linklater tries to recreate the feeling of being so close to a great moment in time and the community of that moment, but the film only goes up when the boys are recruited as intergalactic spies.

Apollo 10 1/2: A Childhood in the Space Age is now streaming on Netflix. The film is 97 minutes long and is rated PG-13 for some explicit content, injury footage, and smoking.

Our rating:

3 out of 5 (good)


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Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood Review – A Beautiful Film We’ve Seen Before

Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood plays like an instructional manual for being a kid in the late sixties. Jack Black’s (School Of Rock) narration is oddly flat considering the performer’s usual flare but it fits with the model of listing a movie’s worth of facts. The animation at large will remind fans of A Scanner Darkly, but flashbacks and vignettes boast a similar yet noticeably different change that is more than welcome. Writer-director Richard Linklater (Boyhood) seems obsessed with making movies about himself as a youth, but the script of Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood has a trick or two up its sleeve.
Stan (Jack Black) is an average nine-year-old living in late-60s Texas. His sister works at Baskin-Robbins, his brother mows lawns, his dad works at NASA and so does Stan — at least for now. The “Apollo 10 1/2” has a design flaw built into its cockpit and only Stan can pilot the craft. Though this secret mission doesn’t get the recognition of Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong, he does still enjoy the highs of life as it is. Board games, sports, trips to Astroworld, watching TV, and listening to records with his family, to name a few.

Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood is another entry into two of Linklater’s go-to choices: a film about a young, southern kid in Vietnam War era America, and animation. 2006’s A Scanner Darkly was revolutionary not only in its animation, but in the story it was telling through animation, and with the added bonus of actors one could see. Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood doesn’t have nearly the same storytelling chops, but it furthers Linklater’s animation career by going backward. The best animation in the film is not with the main storyline, but in everything else. Whenever there is a television, flashback, vignette, or really anything that is out of the main characters’ reality, the animation is stripped down. The result is a smoother texture and a more original vision. Compared to the rest of the film, these scenes feel like moving paintings with a soft touch.
Plot comes in many forms in Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood. News clips, the outer space secret agent fantasies of a child, and — most distracting of all — what feels like endless information in the form of voiceover that does not serve the story. Jack Black doesn’t exactly drone on, but he is not being used to the best of his abilities. There is something intensely boring about a subdued Black, as well as the literal list of what comprised the late 60s and early 70s. A third of Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood is Black taking an inventory of things that are not only obvious, but repetitive. If the film was set in the modern era but wasn’t about the moon landing, there might be room for time-themed context. However, because the audience is so entrenched in the moment, every reference that isn’t specific to Texas feels unwarranted.

Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood is a fun experiment but not much more. There are no heartstrings to pull on and the energetic child astronaut plot is bogged down by 70s references that play on a loop. It’s still fantastic that a film like this can be made today and hardcore Netflix animation fans, as well as those who enjoy Linklater’s work will likely get a kick out of this one. Linklater is trying to recreate the feeling of being so close to a huge moment in time and the community of that moment, but the film only soars when kids are being drafted as intergalactic spies.
Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood is now streaming on Netflix. The film is 97 minutes long and is rated PG-13 for some suggestive material, injury images, and smoking.

Our Rating:
3 out of 5 (Good)

#Apollo #Space #Age #Childhood #Review #Beautiful #Film #Weve

Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood Review – A Beautiful Film We’ve Seen Before

Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood plays like an instructional manual for being a kid in the late sixties. Jack Black’s (School Of Rock) narration is oddly flat considering the performer’s usual flare but it fits with the model of listing a movie’s worth of facts. The animation at large will remind fans of A Scanner Darkly, but flashbacks and vignettes boast a similar yet noticeably different change that is more than welcome. Writer-director Richard Linklater (Boyhood) seems obsessed with making movies about himself as a youth, but the script of Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood has a trick or two up its sleeve.
Stan (Jack Black) is an average nine-year-old living in late-60s Texas. His sister works at Baskin-Robbins, his brother mows lawns, his dad works at NASA and so does Stan — at least for now. The “Apollo 10 1/2” has a design flaw built into its cockpit and only Stan can pilot the craft. Though this secret mission doesn’t get the recognition of Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong, he does still enjoy the highs of life as it is. Board games, sports, trips to Astroworld, watching TV, and listening to records with his family, to name a few.

Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood is another entry into two of Linklater’s go-to choices: a film about a young, southern kid in Vietnam War era America, and animation. 2006’s A Scanner Darkly was revolutionary not only in its animation, but in the story it was telling through animation, and with the added bonus of actors one could see. Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood doesn’t have nearly the same storytelling chops, but it furthers Linklater’s animation career by going backward. The best animation in the film is not with the main storyline, but in everything else. Whenever there is a television, flashback, vignette, or really anything that is out of the main characters’ reality, the animation is stripped down. The result is a smoother texture and a more original vision. Compared to the rest of the film, these scenes feel like moving paintings with a soft touch.
Plot comes in many forms in Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood. News clips, the outer space secret agent fantasies of a child, and — most distracting of all — what feels like endless information in the form of voiceover that does not serve the story. Jack Black doesn’t exactly drone on, but he is not being used to the best of his abilities. There is something intensely boring about a subdued Black, as well as the literal list of what comprised the late 60s and early 70s. A third of Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood is Black taking an inventory of things that are not only obvious, but repetitive. If the film was set in the modern era but wasn’t about the moon landing, there might be room for time-themed context. However, because the audience is so entrenched in the moment, every reference that isn’t specific to Texas feels unwarranted.

Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood is a fun experiment but not much more. There are no heartstrings to pull on and the energetic child astronaut plot is bogged down by 70s references that play on a loop. It’s still fantastic that a film like this can be made today and hardcore Netflix animation fans, as well as those who enjoy Linklater’s work will likely get a kick out of this one. Linklater is trying to recreate the feeling of being so close to a huge moment in time and the community of that moment, but the film only soars when kids are being drafted as intergalactic spies.
Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood is now streaming on Netflix. The film is 97 minutes long and is rated PG-13 for some suggestive material, injury images, and smoking.

Our Rating:
3 out of 5 (Good)

#Apollo #Space #Age #Childhood #Review #Beautiful #Film #Weve


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