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Apple Glasses: Everything we’ve heard so far

The widely popular Apple Glasses remain a mystery as there have been very few solid leaks or rumors about a pair of augmented reality smart glasses the company is supposed to cook.

We thought Apple Glasses (also called Apple Glass by some technologists) would arrive sooner or later. However, it seems more likely that we’ll have to wait at least a few more years before it shows up. It seems more plausible to launch the Apple AR/VR headset first.

Apple Glasses can run on a proprietary operating system that appeared in the final release of iOS 13, although we like the glassOS name. The augmented reality framework appears multiple times in code and text documents; that means Apple is probably testing activation and enforcement to some degree. Anyway, that’s what I need to wear Apple Glasses.

Here’s everything we know about Apple Glasses, including a possible release date, price, design and specs.

apple glass concept

Latest news on Apple Glasses (updated April 19)

  • The AR glasses race could heat up with rumors that Facebook and Amazon are working on something to rival Apple glasses.
  • Could Apple Glasses show up at Apple’s March 8 event? A teaser from Greg Joswiak hints that something AR-centric is about to happen.
  • Apple may be working on “realityOS”, a proprietary operating system for future AR and VR devices.
  • Tim Cook scoffed at Apple’s future AR plans and promised the company would invest in the region. This isn’t a confirmation, but it does suggest that Apple has plans for more AR Spaces beyond what’s currently available on iOS.

Apple Glass Release Date Rumors

Comparison of Apple VR and mixed reality headsets and Apple glasses

In addition to Apple Glass, the Apple VR and mixed reality headset is also in the works and could be less complex and closer to launch.

The Apple VR and mixed reality headset would feature ultra-high-definition displays and a cinematic speaker system that should provide realistic viewing experiences for people viewing the prototypes.

Those sources also said the headset appears to be a thinner, fabric-covered Oculus Quest, but the design isn’t final as the company continues to test to determine the ideal fit for most head shapes.

Although we didn’t expect it to be cheap, there is no information on the price. The Quest starts at $399, HTC’s Vive costs $799, and Microsoft’s HoloLens 2 costs $3,500. Reports claim that Apple’s headset could cost between $1,000 and $3,000 when it launches.

Like its rivals, the Apple VR and mixed reality headset would benefit from its own App Store, where users can access gaming, streaming and communication software. Voice assistant Siri will be responsible for controlling the headphones, although a physical remote and body-tracking controls will also be tested.

As for a potential release date, the VR headset will launch next year and will launch in mid-2022.

If there’s a teaser from Apple’s Greg Joswiak, something could pop up during the March 8 Apple event as well. However, it’s not entirely clear whether the Apple Glasses are the long-talked-about VR/AR headset or something else.

apple glasses price

According to Prosser, Apple Glasses are currently priced at $499 plus prescription fees. Now, that might seem weak, especially compared to competing augmented reality headsets like the Microsoft Hololens 2.

The Hololens 2 has a price tag of $3,500, but much of its cost comes from the fact that all of the electronics needed to run the AR experience are built into the headset.

Instead, Apple Glass will rely on a companion iPhone for rendering, so it will have far fewer parts and complexity than Hololens. With a built-in camera and Alexa integration, the Vuzix Blade will work like smart glasses.

Still, the Vuzix Blade starts at $799. Apple’s entry point is significantly more accessible and costs as much as some of its high-end smartwatches.

Apple Glasses features: what will they actually do?

apple glass

Apple also has plans for third-party apps and is considering a dedicated app store, similar to how you get apps for the Apple TV and Apple Watch.

Additionally, a patent filed with Apple has further fueled the rumor that Apple Glass won’t need corrective lenses, as the smart glasses will automatically adjust for visually impaired people using an “underframe optical”. But this patent could be for a standalone VR headset powered by a second-generation Apple smartphone or smartglass.

apple glasses retinal projection patent images

(Image credit: Apple/USPTO)

A more recent patent also suggests that Apple could use a projection-based system that projects images directly into the user’s eye. In this way, Apple will circumvent the need for any type of transparent screen.

The beam could possibly keep the image always sharp and also avoid the screen problem that doubles as prescription lenses. However, the frames will likely be able to serve as regular prescription glasses for those who need them.

The patent also claims that it avoids many pitfalls people can encounter in VR and AR. Apple explains that some problems, such as headaches, nausea, and eye strain, arise because the brain tries to focus on distant objects; in reality, when they are less than an inch in front of the eye. These problems can be avoided because the retinal projection better mimics the way the eyes receive light.

A patent for chroma keying in Apple Glass

A patent showing how Apple Glass can zoom in on objects while virtually mapping

Apple smart ring patent

A possible use of Apple glasses shown in a patent application

(Image credit: USPTO)

Another recent Apple patent talks about a type of smart glasses, possibly Apple Glasses, and “privacy glasses,” implying how they can be used to keep what’s on your screen private. an iPhone.

The idea is that an iPhone screen is blurry and can only be seen clearly with a pair of Apple smart glasses; See patent image above.

Apple glasses design

Features of Apple Glasses

No details are yet known about Apple Glass, but we can speculate based on what we know about the technology available. For example, it will have at least the same field of view (52 degrees) and resolution (47 ppi) as the Hololens 2.

If Apple is aiming to create a true augmented reality solution as opposed to a heads-up display that shows 2D scrolling notifications or maps like Google Glass, it’s reasonable to expect Apple Glasses to connect directly to the device. iPhone over dedicated Wi-Fi. obligation.

If the iPhone needs to process all of the video captured by the goggle cameras and send the 3D images back to the goggles at a very high frame rate (minimum 60Hz with optimal 120Hz refresh), it will require much more bandwidth than Bluetooth can provide.

When it comes to battery life, we can expect at least three hours if Apple wants to be competitive, but we can assume people will be more lenient about that – especially if Apple provides some sort of case. wireless charging glasses that can extend the runtime throughout the day, such as with Apple AirPods.

Apple Eyewear Privacy and Patents

rendering apple glasses

Apple Reality GlassesOS

A whole new device form factor requires a slimmed-down operating system, and that’s what Apple looks like when it comes to “realityOS” from developer-eyed App Store install logs. of eagle.

Not much is known about this potential software, but it would make sense for Apple to develop an operating system dedicated to VR and AR devices. We’re guessing that such an operating system will have more in common with iOS than with macOS.

Apple Glasses Wishlist: What We Want

(Image credit: Martin Hajek/iDropnews)

Glasses that look like glasses: We want natural looking glasses like the concepts you see on this page. I’m sure Apple wants the same. No one wants AR glasses that look like cheesy clothes.

Full 3D AR: Some people just want a heads-up display, but the real power of augmented reality comes from its full 3D integration. For Apple Glasses to be successful, you need to be able to run any currently running iOS AR app on the iPhone through the wearable.

At least 8 hours of battery life: Assuming you don’t always run 3D AR apps and regularly check notifications and 2D apps in between, Apple should be able to find a way to make Apple Glasses last through an average workday. first generation.

Everything I need to wear Apple Glasses is here.

We’ll continue to update this page as new Apple Glasses rumors and leaks come out. Be sure to check it off and come back.


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Apple Glasses: Everything we’ve heard so far

The much-rumored Apple Glasses still remain somewhat of a mystery, as there have been precious few solid leaks or rumored around a pair of augmented reality smart glasses the company is supposedly cooking up. 
We had thought the Apple Glasses (also referred to as Apple Glass by some tech insiders) would be coming sooner rather than later. But it’s looking ever more likely that we will still have at least a couple of years to wait before they are revealed. It seems more plausible the Apple AR/VR headset would launch first.
Apple Glasses could run on a proprietary operating system uncovered in the final version of iOS 13, though we like the name glassOS. The augmented reality framework shows up multiple times in code and text documents, meaning Apple is likely testing activation and application in some capacity. Either way, this is what it’ll take for me to wear Apple Glasses 
Here’s everything else we know about Apple Glasses, including the potential release date, price, design and specs.

Latest Apple Glasses news (updated April 19)
The AR Glasses race could be heating up, with Facebook and Amazon rumored to be working on something to rival Apple Glasses
Could Apple Glasses make an appearance at the March 8 Apple Event? A teaser from Greg Joswiak hints that something AR-centric will.
Apple could be working on ‘realityOS’ a custom operating system for its future AR and VR gadgets. 
Tim Cook has teased Apple’s future AR plans, promising the company is investing in the area. It’s not confirmation, but this does suggest Apple has plans for more AR spaces beyond what’s currently available on iOS.
Apple Glasses release date rumors

Apple VR and mixed reality headset vs. Apple Glasses
In addition to Apple Glass, the Apple VR and mixed reality headset is also in the works, and could be less complex and closer to launch. 
The Apple VR and mixed reality headset reportedly features ultra-high-resolution screens and a cinematic speaker system that should enable realistic visual experiences, according to people who have seen prototypes. 
Those sources also said the headset looks like a slimmer, fabric-swathed, Oculus Quest, but the design isn’t final as the company continues testing to determine the ideal fit for most head shapes.
There’s no word on price, though we don’t expect it to be cheap. The Quest starts at $399, while HTC’s Vive costs $799 and Microsoft’s HoloLens 2 is a whopping $3,500. Reports claim Apple’s headset could be between $1,000 and $3,000 when it launches.
Like its competitors, the Apple VR and mixed reality headset will reportedly benefit from its own App Store, where users can access gaming, video streaming and communications software. Voice assistant Siri will be tasked with controlling the headset, though a physical remote and body tracking controls are reportedly being tested as well.
As for a potential release date, the VR headset is on pace to debut next year and be released in mid-2022. 
Something may also debut at the March 8 Apple Event, if a teaser from Apple’s Greg Joswiak is anything to go by. But whether it’s Apple Glasses, the long-rumored VR/AR headset, or something else entirely isn’t clear.
Apple Glasses price
According to Prosser the Apple Glasses are currently priced at $499, plus prescription fees. Now that may seem low, especially compared to competing augmented reality headsets like the Microsoft Hololens 2. 
Hololens 2 has a price tag of $3,500 but a big part of of its cost comes from having all the electronics needed to run the AR experience built into the headset. 
Apple Glass, rather, will rely on a companion iPhone for processing, so it will have significantly less parts and complexity than Hololens. It’ll work more like the Vuzix Blade smart glasses, which have a built-in camera and Alexa integration.
Still, Vuzix Blade starts at $799. Apple’s entry point is significantly more accessible, costing as much as some of it’s top-specced smartwatches.
Apple Glasses features: What they’ll actually do

Apple also has plans for third-party apps, and is considering a dedicated app store, similar to how you get apps for the Apple TV and Apple Watch.
Furthermore, a patent granted to Apple has further fuelled the rumor that Apple Glass won’t need prescription lenses as the smartglasses will automatically adjust for people with poor eyesight using an “optical subassembley”. However, this patent could be for a standalone smartphone-powered VR headset or a second-generation pair of Apple smartglasses. 

(Image credit: Apple/USPTO)
A more recent patent also suggests that Apple may employ a projection-based system that beams images directly into the user’s eye. This way Apple would skip the need for any sort of transparent display. 
The beam would likely be able to ensure the image always stays in focus too, avoiding the issue of displays that also double as prescription lenses. Presumably, however, the frames would still be able to double as regular prescription glasses for those that need them.
The patent also claims that this avoids a lot of the pitfalls people may suffer in VR and AR. Apple explains that some issues, including headaches, nausea, and eye strain occur because the brain it trying to focus on objects in the distance, when the reality is they’re on a display less than an inch in front of the eyes. Because retinal projection better mimics how the eyes take in light anyway, these problems can be avoided.

(Image credit: USPTO)
Another recent Apple patent makes mention of “privacy eyewear,”  which would hint at a form of smart glasses, possibly the Apple Glasses, and how they could be used to keep what’s on an iPhone’s display private. 
The idea here is that an iPhone’s display would be blurred and only clearly visible through the pair of Apple smart glasses; see the patent image above. 
Apple Glasses design

Apple Glasses specs
There’s no known specs about the Apple Glass yet, but we can speculate based on what we know about the current tech. For example, it will at least have the same field of view (52-degrees) and resolution (47 ppi) as the Hololens 2.
If Apple aims to create a true augmented reality solution — as opposed to a heads-up display that shows 2D floating notifications or maps, like Google Glass — it’s reasonable to expect the Apple Glasses to connect directly to the iPhone on a dedicated Wi-Fi connection.
If the iPhone has to process all the video captured by the glasses’ cameras and send back the 3D imagery to the glasses at a very high frame per second rate (a bare minimum of 60Hz, with a 120Hz refresh being optimal), it will require a much higher bandwidth than what Bluetooth can provide. 
As for battery life, we can also expect a minimum of three hours if Apple wants to be competitive although we can assume that people will be more forgiving about this — especially if Apple provides with some kind of wireless charging glasses case that can extend its operative time through the day like with the Apple AirPods.
Apple Glasses privacy and patents

Apple Glasses realityOS
A whole new device form factor requires a tweaked operating system, and it looks like that’s what Apple will be providing, with reference to “realityOS” in App Store upload logs by eagle-eyed developers. 
There’s not much information on this potential software, but it would make sense for Apple to come up with a custom OS for it’s VR and AR gadgets. We’d hazard a guess that such an operating system would have more in common with iOS than macOS. 
Apple Glasses wish list: What we want

(Image credit: Martin Hajek/iDropnews)
Glasses that look like glasses: We would like some natural looking glasses, like the ones in the concepts that you see on this page. I’m sure that Apple wants the same thing. No one wants AR glasses that look like geek-wear.
AR in full 3D: Some people would like just a heads-up display, but the true power of AR comes from full 3D integration. For Apple Glasses to be successful, you should be able to run any iOS AR app that currently works on the iPhone through the wearable device.
At least 8 hours of battery life: Assuming you’re not running 3D AR apps all of the time and are periodically looking at notifications and 2D apps in between, Apple should be able to find a way to make Apple Glasses last through an average workday, though it may not happen in the first generation.
Here’s everything else it’ll take for me to wear Apple Glasses.
We will keep updating this page as more Apple Glasses rumors and leaks come out. Make sure to bookmark and come back.

#Apple #Glasses #weve #heard

Apple Glasses: Everything we’ve heard so far

The much-rumored Apple Glasses still remain somewhat of a mystery, as there have been precious few solid leaks or rumored around a pair of augmented reality smart glasses the company is supposedly cooking up. 
We had thought the Apple Glasses (also referred to as Apple Glass by some tech insiders) would be coming sooner rather than later. But it’s looking ever more likely that we will still have at least a couple of years to wait before they are revealed. It seems more plausible the Apple AR/VR headset would launch first.
Apple Glasses could run on a proprietary operating system uncovered in the final version of iOS 13, though we like the name glassOS. The augmented reality framework shows up multiple times in code and text documents, meaning Apple is likely testing activation and application in some capacity. Either way, this is what it’ll take for me to wear Apple Glasses 
Here’s everything else we know about Apple Glasses, including the potential release date, price, design and specs.

Latest Apple Glasses news (updated April 19)
The AR Glasses race could be heating up, with Facebook and Amazon rumored to be working on something to rival Apple Glasses
Could Apple Glasses make an appearance at the March 8 Apple Event? A teaser from Greg Joswiak hints that something AR-centric will.
Apple could be working on ‘realityOS’ a custom operating system for its future AR and VR gadgets. 
Tim Cook has teased Apple’s future AR plans, promising the company is investing in the area. It’s not confirmation, but this does suggest Apple has plans for more AR spaces beyond what’s currently available on iOS.
Apple Glasses release date rumors

Apple VR and mixed reality headset vs. Apple Glasses
In addition to Apple Glass, the Apple VR and mixed reality headset is also in the works, and could be less complex and closer to launch. 
The Apple VR and mixed reality headset reportedly features ultra-high-resolution screens and a cinematic speaker system that should enable realistic visual experiences, according to people who have seen prototypes. 
Those sources also said the headset looks like a slimmer, fabric-swathed, Oculus Quest, but the design isn’t final as the company continues testing to determine the ideal fit for most head shapes.
There’s no word on price, though we don’t expect it to be cheap. The Quest starts at $399, while HTC’s Vive costs $799 and Microsoft’s HoloLens 2 is a whopping $3,500. Reports claim Apple’s headset could be between $1,000 and $3,000 when it launches.
Like its competitors, the Apple VR and mixed reality headset will reportedly benefit from its own App Store, where users can access gaming, video streaming and communications software. Voice assistant Siri will be tasked with controlling the headset, though a physical remote and body tracking controls are reportedly being tested as well.
As for a potential release date, the VR headset is on pace to debut next year and be released in mid-2022. 
Something may also debut at the March 8 Apple Event, if a teaser from Apple’s Greg Joswiak is anything to go by. But whether it’s Apple Glasses, the long-rumored VR/AR headset, or something else entirely isn’t clear.
Apple Glasses price
According to Prosser the Apple Glasses are currently priced at $499, plus prescription fees. Now that may seem low, especially compared to competing augmented reality headsets like the Microsoft Hololens 2. 
Hololens 2 has a price tag of $3,500 but a big part of of its cost comes from having all the electronics needed to run the AR experience built into the headset. 
Apple Glass, rather, will rely on a companion iPhone for processing, so it will have significantly less parts and complexity than Hololens. It’ll work more like the Vuzix Blade smart glasses, which have a built-in camera and Alexa integration.
Still, Vuzix Blade starts at $799. Apple’s entry point is significantly more accessible, costing as much as some of it’s top-specced smartwatches.
Apple Glasses features: What they’ll actually do

Apple also has plans for third-party apps, and is considering a dedicated app store, similar to how you get apps for the Apple TV and Apple Watch.
Furthermore, a patent granted to Apple has further fuelled the rumor that Apple Glass won’t need prescription lenses as the smartglasses will automatically adjust for people with poor eyesight using an “optical subassembley”. However, this patent could be for a standalone smartphone-powered VR headset or a second-generation pair of Apple smartglasses. 

(Image credit: Apple/USPTO)
A more recent patent also suggests that Apple may employ a projection-based system that beams images directly into the user’s eye. This way Apple would skip the need for any sort of transparent display. 
The beam would likely be able to ensure the image always stays in focus too, avoiding the issue of displays that also double as prescription lenses. Presumably, however, the frames would still be able to double as regular prescription glasses for those that need them.
The patent also claims that this avoids a lot of the pitfalls people may suffer in VR and AR. Apple explains that some issues, including headaches, nausea, and eye strain occur because the brain it trying to focus on objects in the distance, when the reality is they’re on a display less than an inch in front of the eyes. Because retinal projection better mimics how the eyes take in light anyway, these problems can be avoided.

(Image credit: USPTO)
Another recent Apple patent makes mention of “privacy eyewear,”  which would hint at a form of smart glasses, possibly the Apple Glasses, and how they could be used to keep what’s on an iPhone’s display private. 
The idea here is that an iPhone’s display would be blurred and only clearly visible through the pair of Apple smart glasses; see the patent image above. 
Apple Glasses design

Apple Glasses specs
There’s no known specs about the Apple Glass yet, but we can speculate based on what we know about the current tech. For example, it will at least have the same field of view (52-degrees) and resolution (47 ppi) as the Hololens 2.
If Apple aims to create a true augmented reality solution — as opposed to a heads-up display that shows 2D floating notifications or maps, like Google Glass — it’s reasonable to expect the Apple Glasses to connect directly to the iPhone on a dedicated Wi-Fi connection.
If the iPhone has to process all the video captured by the glasses’ cameras and send back the 3D imagery to the glasses at a very high frame per second rate (a bare minimum of 60Hz, with a 120Hz refresh being optimal), it will require a much higher bandwidth than what Bluetooth can provide. 
As for battery life, we can also expect a minimum of three hours if Apple wants to be competitive although we can assume that people will be more forgiving about this — especially if Apple provides with some kind of wireless charging glasses case that can extend its operative time through the day like with the Apple AirPods.
Apple Glasses privacy and patents

Apple Glasses realityOS
A whole new device form factor requires a tweaked operating system, and it looks like that’s what Apple will be providing, with reference to “realityOS” in App Store upload logs by eagle-eyed developers. 
There’s not much information on this potential software, but it would make sense for Apple to come up with a custom OS for it’s VR and AR gadgets. We’d hazard a guess that such an operating system would have more in common with iOS than macOS. 
Apple Glasses wish list: What we want

(Image credit: Martin Hajek/iDropnews)
Glasses that look like glasses: We would like some natural looking glasses, like the ones in the concepts that you see on this page. I’m sure that Apple wants the same thing. No one wants AR glasses that look like geek-wear.
AR in full 3D: Some people would like just a heads-up display, but the true power of AR comes from full 3D integration. For Apple Glasses to be successful, you should be able to run any iOS AR app that currently works on the iPhone through the wearable device.
At least 8 hours of battery life: Assuming you’re not running 3D AR apps all of the time and are periodically looking at notifications and 2D apps in between, Apple should be able to find a way to make Apple Glasses last through an average workday, though it may not happen in the first generation.
Here’s everything else it’ll take for me to wear Apple Glasses.
We will keep updating this page as more Apple Glasses rumors and leaks come out. Make sure to bookmark and come back.

#Apple #Glasses #weve #heard


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