Entertainment

Crush Review: A Charismatic Cast Leads Sweet Teen Romance That Plays It Safe

Rowan Blanchard and Auli’i on Cravalho Crush

Crush It follows one of the most common metaphors in teen comedies: unrequited love. This time, however, the key characters are all weird, which is a refreshing change in itself. Directed by Sammi Cohen, from a screenplay by Kirsten King and Casey Rackham Crush It’s a sweet teen romance that plays very carefully to reach its full potential.

The story follows Paige (Rowan Blanchard), a bright young artist who, after graduating from high school, desperately wants to attend a prestigious art school. The app prompt that pauses him invites him to remember his happiest moment. Unfortunately, Paige can’t find one. In love with Gabby for years, she hopes Gabby (Isabella Ferreira) will be the one to give her a truly happy time. As she contemplates her future, an opportunity arises to join the track team to be closer to Gabby. However, as with all great teen novels, things don’t go as planned. Paige develops feelings for someone else and someone else is Gabby’s sister, AJ (Auli’i Cravalho).

The film has a relatively thin script, full of jokes and sass, but there’s little character substance. Everything is fine when the goal is to have Crush Have a fun and enjoyable ride. The focus was on the aesthetics of the film rather than the characters. From the costumes to the character cinematography, the film seeks comfort and flair that many teen comedies lack. Paired with charismatic players, crush The overall mood and tone is delightful. However, it would be nice if the movie didn’t play it so safe and force its characters to be more than they are.

Blanchard is attractive as Paige, a confident but silly and assertive girl whose social status at school is absolutely perfect. She’s unpopular and “she” isn’t the girl, which is refreshing to see because viewers rarely get clues that don’t suffer from the unfortunate social dynamics at school. It’s even more refreshing to see her exist where she’s not the only lesbian in a 50 mile radius. However, while Blanchard is as competent as the leader, he doesn’t stand out the way he should. By contrast, Cravalho is brimming with charisma and has a well-committed character in the supporting role. There is information that refers to an impressive inner life, but viewers do not experience significant moments for him until the third act. Rather, the casting had to be reversed as Cravalho had a palpable charm that Blanchard did not display.

Crush indeed a good time and nothing more. Jokes are quickly erased from memory and there’s not much to say about the characters other than how well they dress. The actors are all playing games, and while the script does them small favors, they help add to the film’s appeal. There are a handful of laughable jokes, but it’s hard to pinpoint anything else with so much blank writing. Again, Crush It’s meant to be an entertaining and enjoyable experience involving a queer community, and at least it is. There’s something to be said for this narrative to be better suited to a series like Netflix’s. heart stopper and Hulu Love, Victor. Fortunately, Crush not a guy. He is efficient in what he wants to do, and that is enough.

Crush A charming and expertly made feature film celebrating the cute and silly romantic adventure of a teenage lesbian. It is led by a cast of charming, simple and extraordinarily talented young actors, Crush It will definitely be a teen romance that will grow in popularity over time.

Crush It premiered on Hulu on Friday, April 29. The film is 93 minutes long and is rated TV-MA.

Our rating:

2.5 out of 5 (fairly good)


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Crush Review: A Charismatic Cast Leads Sweet Teen Romance That Plays It Safe

Rowan Blanchard and Auli’i Cravalho in Crush

Crush follows one of the most common tropes of teen comedies: Unrequited love. Only this time the key characters are all queer, which is in and of itself a refreshing change. Directed by Sammi Cohen from a screenplay by Kirsten King and Casey Rackham, Crush is a sweet teen romance that it plays it far too safe for it to reach its full potential.
The story follows Paige (Rowan Blanchard), a bright young artist who desperately wants to attend a prestigious arts school after graduating high school. The application prompt that gives her pause asks her to recall her happiest moment. Sadly, Paige can’t come up with one. She hopes that Gabby (Isabella Ferreira) will be the one to give her a truly happy moment as she has been crushing on Gabby for years. As she contemplates her future, an opportunity arises to join the track team to get closer to Gabby. However, as with all great teen romances, things don’t go as planned. Paige develops feelings for someone else, and that someone else is Gabby’s sister AJ (Auli’i Cravalho).

The film has a relatively thin script full of quips and sass, but little substance for the characters. This is all well and fine when the goal is to have Crush be a fun and enjoyable ride. A great deal of attention went towards the aesthetics of the film instead of the characters. From the characters’ costumes to the cinematography, the film seeks a level of comfort and style that many teen comedies fail to have. Paired with charismatic actors, Crush’s overall feel and tone are delightful. However, it would have been nice if the film didn’t play it so safe and pushed to have its characters be more than what they are.
Blanchard is charming as Paige, a confident yet dorky artsy girl whose social standing at school is firmly in the middle. She isn’t unpopular and she isn’t the “it” girl, which is refreshing to see because viewers rarely get leads that aren’t suffering from some unfortunate social dynamic at school. Even more refreshing to see her exist in a space where she is not the only lesbian within a 50-mile radius. However, as competent as Blanchard is as the lead, she doesn’t stand out as she should. Cravalho, in comparison, is bursting with charisma and is saddled with a character that is firmly in the supporting role. There is information that alludes to an engaging interior life, but audiences don’t get any big moments for her until the third act. If anything, the casting should have been reversed, as Cravalho has a palpable allure that Blanchard just doesn’t exhibit.

Crush is effectively a good time and nothing else. The jokes quickly fade from memory and there isn’t much to be said of the characters besides the fact they dress nicely. The actors are all game and help build up the film’s charm despite the script doing them little favors. There are a handful of quips that will get a chuckle, but with such hollow writing, it is hard to point out anything else. However, Crush is meant to entertain and be a joyous experience featuring a queer ensemble and it accomplishes that much at least. There is something to be said about this narrative being more suitable for a series like Netflix’s Heartstopper and Hulu’s Love, Victor. Luckily, Crush is not a dud. It is effective at what it sets out to do and that is enough.
Crush is an adorable and competently made feature film that celebrates the cute and dorky romantic adventure of a lesbian teen. Charming, straightforward, and led by a remarkable cast of talented young actors, Crush will surely be a teen romance that gains popularity over time.
Crush began streaming on Hulu Friday, April 29. The film is 93 minutes long and rated TV-MA.

Our Rating:
2.5 out of 5 (Fairly Good)

#Crush #Review #Charismatic #Cast #Leads #Sweet #Teen #Romance #Plays #Safe

Crush Review: A Charismatic Cast Leads Sweet Teen Romance That Plays It Safe

Rowan Blanchard and Auli’i Cravalho in Crush

Crush follows one of the most common tropes of teen comedies: Unrequited love. Only this time the key characters are all queer, which is in and of itself a refreshing change. Directed by Sammi Cohen from a screenplay by Kirsten King and Casey Rackham, Crush is a sweet teen romance that it plays it far too safe for it to reach its full potential.
The story follows Paige (Rowan Blanchard), a bright young artist who desperately wants to attend a prestigious arts school after graduating high school. The application prompt that gives her pause asks her to recall her happiest moment. Sadly, Paige can’t come up with one. She hopes that Gabby (Isabella Ferreira) will be the one to give her a truly happy moment as she has been crushing on Gabby for years. As she contemplates her future, an opportunity arises to join the track team to get closer to Gabby. However, as with all great teen romances, things don’t go as planned. Paige develops feelings for someone else, and that someone else is Gabby’s sister AJ (Auli’i Cravalho).

The film has a relatively thin script full of quips and sass, but little substance for the characters. This is all well and fine when the goal is to have Crush be a fun and enjoyable ride. A great deal of attention went towards the aesthetics of the film instead of the characters. From the characters’ costumes to the cinematography, the film seeks a level of comfort and style that many teen comedies fail to have. Paired with charismatic actors, Crush’s overall feel and tone are delightful. However, it would have been nice if the film didn’t play it so safe and pushed to have its characters be more than what they are.
Blanchard is charming as Paige, a confident yet dorky artsy girl whose social standing at school is firmly in the middle. She isn’t unpopular and she isn’t the “it” girl, which is refreshing to see because viewers rarely get leads that aren’t suffering from some unfortunate social dynamic at school. Even more refreshing to see her exist in a space where she is not the only lesbian within a 50-mile radius. However, as competent as Blanchard is as the lead, she doesn’t stand out as she should. Cravalho, in comparison, is bursting with charisma and is saddled with a character that is firmly in the supporting role. There is information that alludes to an engaging interior life, but audiences don’t get any big moments for her until the third act. If anything, the casting should have been reversed, as Cravalho has a palpable allure that Blanchard just doesn’t exhibit.

Crush is effectively a good time and nothing else. The jokes quickly fade from memory and there isn’t much to be said of the characters besides the fact they dress nicely. The actors are all game and help build up the film’s charm despite the script doing them little favors. There are a handful of quips that will get a chuckle, but with such hollow writing, it is hard to point out anything else. However, Crush is meant to entertain and be a joyous experience featuring a queer ensemble and it accomplishes that much at least. There is something to be said about this narrative being more suitable for a series like Netflix’s Heartstopper and Hulu’s Love, Victor. Luckily, Crush is not a dud. It is effective at what it sets out to do and that is enough.
Crush is an adorable and competently made feature film that celebrates the cute and dorky romantic adventure of a lesbian teen. Charming, straightforward, and led by a remarkable cast of talented young actors, Crush will surely be a teen romance that gains popularity over time.
Crush began streaming on Hulu Friday, April 29. The film is 93 minutes long and rated TV-MA.

Our Rating:
2.5 out of 5 (Fairly Good)

#Crush #Review #Charismatic #Cast #Leads #Sweet #Teen #Romance #Plays #Safe


Synthetic: Ôn Thi HSG

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