Entertainment

Deep In The Forest Review: A Modern Civil War With Big Ideas, Poor Execution

Writer-director Jeremy Dylan Lanni (Heal Thyself) and co-writer Pasquale Lanni take on America’s current political state in Deep in the Forest. The film is trying to capture the future and one can feel that effort in most scenes. Unfortunately, the film flounders all the way up to its final five minutes and offers little in the way of insight. No performance stands out and the intensity of the situation shifts quite often for a film with a singular tone. The story stops being interesting at its conception and the final nail in the coffin is the unforgivable dialogue. Even by B-movie standards, the average fan can guess what a character will say in any given scene.

SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

When American forces meet military resistance, the country becomes politically divided in the most literal way. Members of the local Democratic Club show up to a meeting and are informed that tensions are high, but the safest course of action is to return home and lock the doors. Upon their return, each member and their family are abducted by men in fatigues. They arrive on a property in the middle of nowhere and are informed by the leader of the Democratic Club that their progressive views have put them on a government hit list and they offer the property as a safe house. For a while, things go smoothly, but once opposing forces enter the fray, the group splinters and tough decisions must be made.

What good can be said about Deep in the Forest is that there are close to zero digressions and the A-plot takes up most of the film’s runtime. Far superior movies have made the mistake of giving backstory to tertiary characters and feeling that everyone needs a plot unto themselves. Deep in the Forest has some mild marital drama, but even that is weaved into the plot by the film’s end, offering the most interesting character dynamics. Though most of the ideas are run-of-the-mill, the one presented before the ending credits is legitimately stirring.

Things get interesting when the notion of keeping a hostage is brought up amongst a group of outspoken liberals. This is the only story arc of Deep in the Forest that holds any merit. The group ultimately compromises on their ideals, locking up a man they judge to be dangerous. In these moments it feels like the film has found some solid footing, but moments later it is back on its predictable track.

Deep in the Forest is constantly being held hostage by the direction and acting. No actor stands out and as a unit, it’s like they are barely in the same film. The editing does not help matters at all. Spoken lines are left to hang for extra beats, monologues are delivered the actors with no verve, and the action is almost never believable. Combined with a script with so little to offer, Deep in the Forest falls short in every single way.

Though there is a truly impactful ending waiting for audiences at the conclusion of Deep in the Forest, it’s hardly worth sitting through the entire film for it. That is saying something for a movie less than 90 minutes long. The themes presented are extremely relevant, but almost never hit home. The script is perhaps too well-intentioned, leaning into self-deprecating liberal jokes in lieu of meaningful exploration. On top of it all lies a string of performances that would make even the casual moviegoer roll their eyes. Deep in the Forest certainly has a point of view, but it is ultimately a meandering slog.

Deep in the Forest is on-demand and digital May 31. The film is 81 minutes long and is rated R for language and a violent image.

Our Rating:

1.5 out of 5 (Poor, A Few Good Parts)


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Deep In The Forest Review: A Modern Civil War With Big Ideas, Poor Execution

Writer-director Jeremy Dylan Lanni (Heal Thyself) and co-writer Pasquale Lanni take on America’s current political state in Deep in the Forest. The film is trying to capture the future and one can feel that effort in most scenes. Unfortunately, the film flounders all the way up to its final five minutes and offers little in the way of insight. No performance stands out and the intensity of the situation shifts quite often for a film with a singular tone. The story stops being interesting at its conception and the final nail in the coffin is the unforgivable dialogue. Even by B-movie standards, the average fan can guess what a character will say in any given scene.
SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY
When American forces meet military resistance, the country becomes politically divided in the most literal way. Members of the local Democratic Club show up to a meeting and are informed that tensions are high, but the safest course of action is to return home and lock the doors. Upon their return, each member and their family are abducted by men in fatigues. They arrive on a property in the middle of nowhere and are informed by the leader of the Democratic Club that their progressive views have put them on a government hit list and they offer the property as a safe house. For a while, things go smoothly, but once opposing forces enter the fray, the group splinters and tough decisions must be made.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr2’); });

What good can be said about Deep in the Forest is that there are close to zero digressions and the A-plot takes up most of the film’s runtime. Far superior movies have made the mistake of giving backstory to tertiary characters and feeling that everyone needs a plot unto themselves. Deep in the Forest has some mild marital drama, but even that is weaved into the plot by the film’s end, offering the most interesting character dynamics. Though most of the ideas are run-of-the-mill, the one presented before the ending credits is legitimately stirring.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Things get interesting when the notion of keeping a hostage is brought up amongst a group of outspoken liberals. This is the only story arc of Deep in the Forest that holds any merit. The group ultimately compromises on their ideals, locking up a man they judge to be dangerous. In these moments it feels like the film has found some solid footing, but moments later it is back on its predictable track.

Deep in the Forest is constantly being held hostage by the direction and acting. No actor stands out and as a unit, it’s like they are barely in the same film. The editing does not help matters at all. Spoken lines are left to hang for extra beats, monologues are delivered the actors with no verve, and the action is almost never believable. Combined with a script with so little to offer, Deep in the Forest falls short in every single way.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

Though there is a truly impactful ending waiting for audiences at the conclusion of Deep in the Forest, it’s hardly worth sitting through the entire film for it. That is saying something for a movie less than 90 minutes long. The themes presented are extremely relevant, but almost never hit home. The script is perhaps too well-intentioned, leaning into self-deprecating liberal jokes in lieu of meaningful exploration. On top of it all lies a string of performances that would make even the casual moviegoer roll their eyes. Deep in the Forest certainly has a point of view, but it is ultimately a meandering slog.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

Deep in the Forest is on-demand and digital May 31. The film is 81 minutes long and is rated R for language and a violent image.

Our Rating:
1.5 out of 5 (Poor, A Few Good Parts)

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Deep #Forest #Review #Modern #Civil #War #Big #Ideas #Poor #Execution

Deep In The Forest Review: A Modern Civil War With Big Ideas, Poor Execution

Writer-director Jeremy Dylan Lanni (Heal Thyself) and co-writer Pasquale Lanni take on America’s current political state in Deep in the Forest. The film is trying to capture the future and one can feel that effort in most scenes. Unfortunately, the film flounders all the way up to its final five minutes and offers little in the way of insight. No performance stands out and the intensity of the situation shifts quite often for a film with a singular tone. The story stops being interesting at its conception and the final nail in the coffin is the unforgivable dialogue. Even by B-movie standards, the average fan can guess what a character will say in any given scene.
SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY
When American forces meet military resistance, the country becomes politically divided in the most literal way. Members of the local Democratic Club show up to a meeting and are informed that tensions are high, but the safest course of action is to return home and lock the doors. Upon their return, each member and their family are abducted by men in fatigues. They arrive on a property in the middle of nowhere and are informed by the leader of the Democratic Club that their progressive views have put them on a government hit list and they offer the property as a safe house. For a while, things go smoothly, but once opposing forces enter the fray, the group splinters and tough decisions must be made.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr2’); });

What good can be said about Deep in the Forest is that there are close to zero digressions and the A-plot takes up most of the film’s runtime. Far superior movies have made the mistake of giving backstory to tertiary characters and feeling that everyone needs a plot unto themselves. Deep in the Forest has some mild marital drama, but even that is weaved into the plot by the film’s end, offering the most interesting character dynamics. Though most of the ideas are run-of-the-mill, the one presented before the ending credits is legitimately stirring.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Things get interesting when the notion of keeping a hostage is brought up amongst a group of outspoken liberals. This is the only story arc of Deep in the Forest that holds any merit. The group ultimately compromises on their ideals, locking up a man they judge to be dangerous. In these moments it feels like the film has found some solid footing, but moments later it is back on its predictable track.

Deep in the Forest is constantly being held hostage by the direction and acting. No actor stands out and as a unit, it’s like they are barely in the same film. The editing does not help matters at all. Spoken lines are left to hang for extra beats, monologues are delivered the actors with no verve, and the action is almost never believable. Combined with a script with so little to offer, Deep in the Forest falls short in every single way.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

Though there is a truly impactful ending waiting for audiences at the conclusion of Deep in the Forest, it’s hardly worth sitting through the entire film for it. That is saying something for a movie less than 90 minutes long. The themes presented are extremely relevant, but almost never hit home. The script is perhaps too well-intentioned, leaning into self-deprecating liberal jokes in lieu of meaningful exploration. On top of it all lies a string of performances that would make even the casual moviegoer roll their eyes. Deep in the Forest certainly has a point of view, but it is ultimately a meandering slog.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

Deep in the Forest is on-demand and digital May 31. The film is 81 minutes long and is rated R for language and a violent image.

Our Rating:
1.5 out of 5 (Poor, A Few Good Parts)

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Deep #Forest #Review #Modern #Civil #War #Big #Ideas #Poor #Execution


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