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Deliver Us Mars devs on going the extra mile to create a credible alien world

Deliver us Mars

See you Mars looks bleak. It looks intimidating. In the most desperate, isolating and life-threatening sense, it sounds terrifying. And those are just a few of the compliments I can give for a first look at the upcoming sci-fi puzzle adventure from KeokeN Interactive and Frontier Foundry.

The first look at the developer’s follow-up to Deliver Us the Moon came during the Future Games Show Spring Showcase last month, when a super moody promotional trailer set the tone. Speaking to GamesRadar+ after this world premiere, KeokeN’s Koen Deetman said we should expect an equally non-violent, story-driven adventure – this time on the Red Planet – but “an adventure with a leap in radical forward in storytelling and gameplay”. ”, terms on the precursor 2018.

See red

FUTURE GAMES SHOWFGS Spring 2022 V3

“Expanding the narrative in Deliver to Us Mars means we’re really going the extra mile to capture real live performances, including not just audio but also body and face,” says Deetman. “It adds credibility to the characters you’ll meet in the game and this story is brought to life by a fantastic cast which we may reveal and discuss at a later date.

“You don’t commit any acts of violence on the Deliver Us series, so it wasn’t easy for us to create a natural method of pressure/conflict resolution. With the climbing ability we’ve added to this game, players will experience that sort of “catch or fall” feeling of danger – it also adds to the sense of verticality in our game without the need to use stairs or lifts. ”

“Compared to the previous game, the puzzles in Deliver Us Mars have changed from a single system to a more connected system with mechanics that give you more engaging and challenging storylines than before. Sometimes these puzzles have more than one solution.

Deliver us Mars

(Image credit: border)

Based on real-world questions posed by its predecessor regarding climate change and protecting planet Earth, Deliver Us Mars is set 10 years later. And while the culmination of Deliver Us the Moon offers a temporary solution to the world’s self-destructive diseases, Deliver Us Mars aims to offer hope through its learning-by-doing approach and design. In doing so, Deliver Us Mars will certainly adopt a third-person perspective – a different step from the various fixed and trailing camera shots of its predecessor.

Deetman says, “Both perspectives have their pros and cons, but the third-person perspective gives the player the ability to see their astronauts in all their glory. It’s nice to drive an expensive car, but actually the seeing from the outside is where the magic kicks in, isn’t it?The same thing happens when you see our hero dressed in a sleek high-tech futuristic astronaut suit – it’s is the Ferrari of our game, so to speak.”

“There’s another reason we love this perspective: In Deliver Us The Moon, it felt like this silent astronaut could be you as a player, which is until the end of the game. , when we finally reveal who the astronaut is. . It was a suit. You can imagine that a completely first-person perspective works for a completely anonymous main character, but the identity of the person you play in this series is important. Players will be very clear about who their main characters are from the start of Deliver Us Mars, so it makes more sense to play with him from a third-person perspective, especially when things like motion capture come into play. “

new world orders

Deliver us the moon

(Image credit: Wired Productions)

“Compared to our previous game, the puzzles here have changed from a single system to a more highly connected system with mechanics that give you more engaging and challenging scenarios.”

Koen Deetman, KeokeN

Surrender to Us The Mars trailer is as atmospheric as it comes – but we’re still faced with more questions than answers. What caused our emergency landing? Can our defective ship be repaired? What is this disturbing monolith in the distance? How about that red-handled pickaxe from B&Q or Homebase? Deliver Us Mars doesn’t yet have a concrete release window, but Deetman reassures us that everything will appear when the time is right, and that everything the game suggests about life in the barren expanse of Mars has been explored at the highest level. possible.

“You may have noticed that humanity has yet to colonize Mars, so when trying to stick to an accurate representation of this planet, one has to settle for what various Mars rovers and scientists have shown. in the world. We’re using that as a basis for our starting point,” adds Deetman. “With Deliver Us the Moon, we asked the astronauts to validate some of the ways the game depicts its real environment. Obviously that’s not possible. with Mars, but we studied the behavior of its atmosphere, how the color of the landscape changes during the night and how gravity behaves in relation to the Earth and the Moon. It was important for us to capture this natural character of the planet.

“The other question we asked was how would humans actually colonize such a planet? Throughout the development of Deliver Us Mars, we learned a lot about how difficult it really is, and it just underlined how much the planet Earth is truly precious.”

Bring Us Mars Appears In Upcoming Game Show

(Image credit: Frontier Foundry)

Other less conceptual challenges that KeokeN faces relate to next-gen hardware. First released on PC in 2018, Deliver Us the Moon was re-released on desktop the following year before debuting on PS4 and Xbox One in 2020. Now, two years later, Deliver Us the Moon is gearing up for PS5 and Xbox Series. Launching X on May 19 – a process that Deetman says has helped the developer for both the first game and the upcoming sequel. From the 4K visuals to the literal feeling of vertigo peering over one of the Red Planet’s blade grooves, Deliver Us Mars seems to be taking shape well in its current state. Deetman can’t say much more right now, but he promises it’ll be worth the wait.

“We were very lucky to have next-gen hardware for Deliver Us The Moon and also to develop Deliver Us Mars. It certainly benefited from the knowledge we gained from passing our previous game to the next generation. I’ve seen players asking what this “next-gen feeling” is, but I can assure you that Deliver Us Mars will give players that feeling – this game sounds really good and looks good.

Learn more about Deliver Us Mars on the game’s official website.


Do you like indie games? here is the best new indie games These are available now or coming soon.


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Deliver Us Mars devs on going the extra mile to create a credible alien world

Deliver Us Mars looks bleak. It looks daunting. In the most desperate, isolating and life-threatening sense, it looks terrifying. And these are just some of the compliments I could pay KeokeN Interactive and Frontier Foundry’s upcoming sci-fi puzzle adventure at first glance. 
That early glimpse of the developer’s follow-up to Deliver Us the Moon came during last month’s Future Games Show Spring Showcase, when a super moody reveal trailer set the tone. Speaking to GamesRadar+ in the wake of that world premiere, KeokeN’s Koen Deetman said we should expect a similarly non-violent, story-driven odyssey – this time set on the Red Planet – but one that is a “radical step up in narrative and gameplay” terms over its 2018 forerunner.
Seeing red
FUTURE GAMES SHOW

“Expanding on the narrative in Deliver Us Mars means that we really went the extra mile in getting actual live performances captured, not only voice but body and face, too,” explains Deetman. “It deepens the believability of the characters you’ll encounter in the game – and this story is brought to life by a fantastic cast, who we’ll be able to reveal and discuss at a later date.”
“In the Deliver Us series, you don’t commit any violent acts, so crafting a natural pressure/conflict resolve method wasn’t easy for us. With the climbing ability we’ve added to this game, players will experience this type of ‘hold on or fall’ feel of danger – plus it enhances the feeling of verticality in our game without us needing to use stairs or elevators.” 
“Compared to the previous game, the puzzles in Deliver Us Mars have evolved from one-offs to a more elevated connected system with mechanics that give you more engaging and challenging scenarios than before. Sometimes, too, these puzzles have more than just one solution.”

(Image credit: Frontier)
Building on the real-world questions posed by its predecessor – tied to climate change and preserving planet Earth – Deliver Us Mars is set 10 years into the future. And while the climax of Deliver Us the Moon provided a temporary solution to the world’s self-destructive ills, Deliver Us Mars aims to offer hope with its learn-by-doing approach and design. In doing so, Deliver Us Mars will adopt a strictly third-person perspective – a distinguished step away from its forerunner’s variety of fixed and tracking camera shots.
On this, Deetman says: “Both perspectives have their positives and negatives, but the third-person perspective gives the player the ability to see their astronaut in their full glory. Driving an expensive car is nice, but actually seeing it from the outside is where the real magic comes from, right? It’s similar when you see our protagonist in her slick high-tech futuristic astronaut suit – it’s the Ferrari of our game, so to speak.”
“There’s another reason we like this perspective, though: in Deliver Us The Moon, there was a sense that this silent astronaut could’ve been you as a player – that is, until late in the game when we finally revealed who the astronaut in the suit was. You could imagine a wholly first-person perspective working well for a completely anonymous main character, but the identity of who you’re playing as is important in this series. Players will be very clear from the start of Deliver Us Mars of who their protagonist is, and therefore playing as her from a third-person perspective makes more sense – especially when elements like motion-capture come into play.”
New world orders 

(Image credit: Wired Productions)

“Compared to our previous game, the puzzles here have evolved from one-offs to a more elevated connected system with mechanics that give you more engaging and challenging scenarios.”
Koen Deetman, KeokeN

To its credit, the Deliver Us Mars reveal trailer is as atmospheric as they come – but we’re nevertheless left with more questions than answers. What caused our crash landing? Can our malfunctioning ship be repaired? What is that ominous monolith in the distance? And is that red-handled pick-axe from B&Q or Homebase? Deliver Us Mars is as yet without a concrete release window, but Deetman assures us all will be revealed in due course, and that everything the game proposes with regards to life on the barren Mars sprawl has been researched to the fullest possible degree.  
“You’ve no doubt noticed that humanity hasn’t colonized Mars yet, so we have to make do with what the various Mars rovers and scientists are showing to the world when we try to stick to an authentic representation of this planet. We use that as a basis for our starting point,” Deetman adds. “With Deliver Us The Moon, we had astronauts confirm some of the ways the game depicted its real-life setting. That’s obviously not possible to do with Mars, but we studied the behavior of its atmosphere, how the color of the landscape changes through the night, and how its gravity behaves in comparison to Earth and the Moon. This natural character of the planet was important for us to capture.”
“Another question we asked was, how would human beings actually colonize a planet like this? Throughout the development of Deliver Us Mars, we’ve learned a lot about how challenging this would actually be, and it underlined to us just how precious planet Earth really is.”

(Image credit: Frontier Foundry)
Other, less conceptual challenges faced by KeokeN pertain to new-gen hardware. Having first launched on PC in 2018, Deliver Us the Moon was re-released on desktops the following year, before debuting on PS4 and Xbox One in 2020. Now, two years on, Deliver Us the Moon is preparing for a PS5 and Xbox Series X launch on May 19 – a process that Deetman believes has helped both the developer’s first game and its forthcoming sequel. From 4K visuals to feeling genuine vertigo from peering over one of the Red Planet’s knife-edge gullies, it sounds like Deliver Us Mars is shaping up nicely in its current state. Deetman can’t say much more than that currently, but he does promise the wait will be worth it. 
He adds: “We’ve been really fortunate to have had the next-gen hardware at our disposal for Deliver Us The Moon while also developing Deliver Us Mars. It has absolutely benefitted from the knowledge we’ve acquired getting our previous game to next gen. I’ve seen players ask what that ‘next-gen feeling’ is, but I can assure you Deliver Us Mars will bring players that sensation – this game really looks and sounds the part.”
Read more about Deliver Us Mars on the game’s official website. 
Love indie games? Here’s all the best new indie games that’re out now or coming soon. 

#Deliver #Mars #devs #extra #mile #create #credible #alien #world

Deliver Us Mars devs on going the extra mile to create a credible alien world

Deliver Us Mars looks bleak. It looks daunting. In the most desperate, isolating and life-threatening sense, it looks terrifying. And these are just some of the compliments I could pay KeokeN Interactive and Frontier Foundry’s upcoming sci-fi puzzle adventure at first glance. 
That early glimpse of the developer’s follow-up to Deliver Us the Moon came during last month’s Future Games Show Spring Showcase, when a super moody reveal trailer set the tone. Speaking to GamesRadar+ in the wake of that world premiere, KeokeN’s Koen Deetman said we should expect a similarly non-violent, story-driven odyssey – this time set on the Red Planet – but one that is a “radical step up in narrative and gameplay” terms over its 2018 forerunner.
Seeing red
FUTURE GAMES SHOW

“Expanding on the narrative in Deliver Us Mars means that we really went the extra mile in getting actual live performances captured, not only voice but body and face, too,” explains Deetman. “It deepens the believability of the characters you’ll encounter in the game – and this story is brought to life by a fantastic cast, who we’ll be able to reveal and discuss at a later date.”
“In the Deliver Us series, you don’t commit any violent acts, so crafting a natural pressure/conflict resolve method wasn’t easy for us. With the climbing ability we’ve added to this game, players will experience this type of ‘hold on or fall’ feel of danger – plus it enhances the feeling of verticality in our game without us needing to use stairs or elevators.” 
“Compared to the previous game, the puzzles in Deliver Us Mars have evolved from one-offs to a more elevated connected system with mechanics that give you more engaging and challenging scenarios than before. Sometimes, too, these puzzles have more than just one solution.”

(Image credit: Frontier)
Building on the real-world questions posed by its predecessor – tied to climate change and preserving planet Earth – Deliver Us Mars is set 10 years into the future. And while the climax of Deliver Us the Moon provided a temporary solution to the world’s self-destructive ills, Deliver Us Mars aims to offer hope with its learn-by-doing approach and design. In doing so, Deliver Us Mars will adopt a strictly third-person perspective – a distinguished step away from its forerunner’s variety of fixed and tracking camera shots.
On this, Deetman says: “Both perspectives have their positives and negatives, but the third-person perspective gives the player the ability to see their astronaut in their full glory. Driving an expensive car is nice, but actually seeing it from the outside is where the real magic comes from, right? It’s similar when you see our protagonist in her slick high-tech futuristic astronaut suit – it’s the Ferrari of our game, so to speak.”
“There’s another reason we like this perspective, though: in Deliver Us The Moon, there was a sense that this silent astronaut could’ve been you as a player – that is, until late in the game when we finally revealed who the astronaut in the suit was. You could imagine a wholly first-person perspective working well for a completely anonymous main character, but the identity of who you’re playing as is important in this series. Players will be very clear from the start of Deliver Us Mars of who their protagonist is, and therefore playing as her from a third-person perspective makes more sense – especially when elements like motion-capture come into play.”
New world orders 

(Image credit: Wired Productions)

“Compared to our previous game, the puzzles here have evolved from one-offs to a more elevated connected system with mechanics that give you more engaging and challenging scenarios.”
Koen Deetman, KeokeN

To its credit, the Deliver Us Mars reveal trailer is as atmospheric as they come – but we’re nevertheless left with more questions than answers. What caused our crash landing? Can our malfunctioning ship be repaired? What is that ominous monolith in the distance? And is that red-handled pick-axe from B&Q or Homebase? Deliver Us Mars is as yet without a concrete release window, but Deetman assures us all will be revealed in due course, and that everything the game proposes with regards to life on the barren Mars sprawl has been researched to the fullest possible degree.  
“You’ve no doubt noticed that humanity hasn’t colonized Mars yet, so we have to make do with what the various Mars rovers and scientists are showing to the world when we try to stick to an authentic representation of this planet. We use that as a basis for our starting point,” Deetman adds. “With Deliver Us The Moon, we had astronauts confirm some of the ways the game depicted its real-life setting. That’s obviously not possible to do with Mars, but we studied the behavior of its atmosphere, how the color of the landscape changes through the night, and how its gravity behaves in comparison to Earth and the Moon. This natural character of the planet was important for us to capture.”
“Another question we asked was, how would human beings actually colonize a planet like this? Throughout the development of Deliver Us Mars, we’ve learned a lot about how challenging this would actually be, and it underlined to us just how precious planet Earth really is.”

(Image credit: Frontier Foundry)
Other, less conceptual challenges faced by KeokeN pertain to new-gen hardware. Having first launched on PC in 2018, Deliver Us the Moon was re-released on desktops the following year, before debuting on PS4 and Xbox One in 2020. Now, two years on, Deliver Us the Moon is preparing for a PS5 and Xbox Series X launch on May 19 – a process that Deetman believes has helped both the developer’s first game and its forthcoming sequel. From 4K visuals to feeling genuine vertigo from peering over one of the Red Planet’s knife-edge gullies, it sounds like Deliver Us Mars is shaping up nicely in its current state. Deetman can’t say much more than that currently, but he does promise the wait will be worth it. 
He adds: “We’ve been really fortunate to have had the next-gen hardware at our disposal for Deliver Us The Moon while also developing Deliver Us Mars. It has absolutely benefitted from the knowledge we’ve acquired getting our previous game to next gen. I’ve seen players ask what that ‘next-gen feeling’ is, but I can assure you Deliver Us Mars will bring players that sensation – this game really looks and sounds the part.”
Read more about Deliver Us Mars on the game’s official website. 
Love indie games? Here’s all the best new indie games that’re out now or coming soon. 

#Deliver #Mars #devs #extra #mile #create #credible #alien #world


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