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Robin’s Codename Is a Total Betrayal of Its Real-Life Mythic Origins

For the average reader, there may be little or no connection between them. from batman frequent duty, robinand legendary Robin Hood, beyond sharing a first name, of course. But unfortunately, the two are internally interconnected far more than even the average DC player can comprehend. Again, perhaps the problem lies in how the former was inspired by the latter while considering that they are so different.

Robin Hood is a classic literary outlaw who lives and dies by the logic of take from the rich and give to the poor. By the way, Batman’s famous sidekick is just that. Robin, in all his forms, incarnations and secret identities, is the trusted sidekick and confidant of the world’s greatest detective.

The foundation of this family friendship begins inside first. Detective comics #38 is by Bill Finger and Bob Kane where Dick Grayson debuted as The Boy Wonder. He adopts the pseudonym of Robin when the story introduces his transformation into Dick, “today’s young Robinhood“Funny enough, over the course of the 82-year comic book run, Robin has become the complete antithesis of everything Robin Hood is. Robin Hood is a character who prides himself on robbing the rich and giving away the same wealth to the poor. He was not a vigilante in the same vein as the Bat family, but rather, in exaggerated terms, a militant thief. In simpler terms, he is a thief, plain and simple. He does not take the justice in hand, but also exposes the flaws in the justice system by robbing it by funding the underrepresented.

Reversing an interesting fate, Robins was always someone who bragged about teaming up with a billionaire and beating up (often poor) criminals and handing them over to be arrested by the heavily funded authorities. Even though Nightwing promised to use his money better than his mentor, he has become quite wealthy lately. Following in the footsteps of his mentor Batman, Robin brings justice to the economically disadvantaged thieves of Gotham City with an iron fist, and in many ways the GCPD does a favor to fend off crooks on their behalf. Obviously, Robin keeps tough criminals off the streets, but in some of these cases, the poor criminals are exactly the kind of people Robin Hood would protect and give away stolen riches. It’s something even Robin’s ex Jason Todd has criticized in the past (which is ironic in itself, given that Red Hood went under Batman’s wing trying to steal the Batmobile’s tires. of the Dark Knight.

Nobody’s saying what Robin did was wrong, but the real irony that a Wonderboy gets his name from the kind of criminal he’d throw in a cell any night is hard not to find funny. excuse me from batman adopted but Robin Hood would probably hate the hero robin chose to be.


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Robin’s Codename Is a Total Betrayal of Its Real-Life Mythic Origins

For the average reader, there may be little to no connection between Batman’s frequent ward, Robin, and the legendary Robin Hood, beyond sharing a first name, of course. But alas, the two are far more intrinsically linked to each other than even the average DC reader may understand. Then again, maybe that in itself is the problem, considering they are so different despite how the former was inspired by the latter.
Robin Hood is the classic literary outlaw who lives and dies by the mantra of taking from the rich and giving to the poor. The famous Batman sidekick, meanwhile, is just that. Robin, in all of his forms, incarnations, and secret identities, serves as the trusty assistant and confidante to the World’s Greatest Detective.
The foundation for this familial friendship first begins inside Detective Comics #38 by Bill Finger and Bob Kane where Dick Grayson makes his debut as The Boy Wonder. He adopts the Robin nickname once narration introduces his transformation as Dick becoming, “that young Robinhood of today.” Funny enough, over the course of his 82-year run in the comics, Robin ended up becoming the complete antithesis of everything that Robin Hood was about. Robin Hood is a character who prides himself on stealing from the rich and giving those same riches to the poor. He was no vigilante in the same vein as the Bat-family, but instead, in extravagant terms, he’s an activist thief. In simpler terms, he’s a thief, plain and simple. He doesn’t take justice into his own hands as much as he exposes flaws in the justice system by stealing from it, simultaneously funding the underrepresented.

In an interesting reversal of fortunes, Robins has always been someone who prides himself on teaming up with a billionaire to beat up (often poor) criminals and turning them in to be arrested by the heavily financed authorities. Nightwing himself even recently became quite wealthy himself, though he promises to use his money better than his mentor. Following in the footsteps of his mentor, Batman, Robin deals out justice with an iron fist reigning down heavy on the economically disadvantaged thieves of Gotham City, in many ways doing the GCPD a favor in wrangling up crooks for them. Obviously, Robin is keeping hardened criminals off the streets, but in some of these cases, the impoverished criminals are exactly the kind of people Robin Hood would be protecting and giving stolen riches to. This is something that even former Robin, Jason Todd, has criticized in the past (which is ironic in itself, considering that Red Hood came under Batman’s wing by trying to steal the tires off the Dark Knight’s Batmobile.
No one is saying that Robin is in the wrong for what he does, but it’s hard not to find the real irony amusing of a Boy Wonder adopting his name from the kind of criminal he’d throw in a jail cell on any given night. No offense to Batman’s adopted son, but Robin Hood would probably hate the hero that Robin has chosen to become.

#Robins #Codename #Total #Betrayal #RealLife #Mythic #Origins

Robin’s Codename Is a Total Betrayal of Its Real-Life Mythic Origins

For the average reader, there may be little to no connection between Batman’s frequent ward, Robin, and the legendary Robin Hood, beyond sharing a first name, of course. But alas, the two are far more intrinsically linked to each other than even the average DC reader may understand. Then again, maybe that in itself is the problem, considering they are so different despite how the former was inspired by the latter.
Robin Hood is the classic literary outlaw who lives and dies by the mantra of taking from the rich and giving to the poor. The famous Batman sidekick, meanwhile, is just that. Robin, in all of his forms, incarnations, and secret identities, serves as the trusty assistant and confidante to the World’s Greatest Detective.
The foundation for this familial friendship first begins inside Detective Comics #38 by Bill Finger and Bob Kane where Dick Grayson makes his debut as The Boy Wonder. He adopts the Robin nickname once narration introduces his transformation as Dick becoming, “that young Robinhood of today.” Funny enough, over the course of his 82-year run in the comics, Robin ended up becoming the complete antithesis of everything that Robin Hood was about. Robin Hood is a character who prides himself on stealing from the rich and giving those same riches to the poor. He was no vigilante in the same vein as the Bat-family, but instead, in extravagant terms, he’s an activist thief. In simpler terms, he’s a thief, plain and simple. He doesn’t take justice into his own hands as much as he exposes flaws in the justice system by stealing from it, simultaneously funding the underrepresented.

In an interesting reversal of fortunes, Robins has always been someone who prides himself on teaming up with a billionaire to beat up (often poor) criminals and turning them in to be arrested by the heavily financed authorities. Nightwing himself even recently became quite wealthy himself, though he promises to use his money better than his mentor. Following in the footsteps of his mentor, Batman, Robin deals out justice with an iron fist reigning down heavy on the economically disadvantaged thieves of Gotham City, in many ways doing the GCPD a favor in wrangling up crooks for them. Obviously, Robin is keeping hardened criminals off the streets, but in some of these cases, the impoverished criminals are exactly the kind of people Robin Hood would be protecting and giving stolen riches to. This is something that even former Robin, Jason Todd, has criticized in the past (which is ironic in itself, considering that Red Hood came under Batman’s wing by trying to steal the tires off the Dark Knight’s Batmobile.
No one is saying that Robin is in the wrong for what he does, but it’s hard not to find the real irony amusing of a Boy Wonder adopting his name from the kind of criminal he’d throw in a jail cell on any given night. No offense to Batman’s adopted son, but Robin Hood would probably hate the hero that Robin has chosen to become.

#Robins #Codename #Total #Betrayal #RealLife #Mythic #Origins


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