Game

The making of Resident Evil 4: “By that point in the series, zombies were simply no longer scary to players”

Oddly enough, the best part about Resident Evil 4 is that it’s not really a Resident Evil game. With the established survival horror formula perfected by three PlayStation titles and multiple spin-offs, the development team and fans alike wanted something new, something different, something challenging.

It hasn’t been easy for Capcom, with the team exploring supernatural and supernatural elements early in development as workarounds to growing zombie fatigue, but it’s hard to argue the end product isn’t worth the effort. to wait. It was no longer survival horror, eschewing static camera angles for an over-the-shoulder relationship that quickly became a staple of third-person shooters, and leaving brain-eating idiots to rot to leave a crowd. get on stage. – it was a survival terror.

A subtle difference in language, of course, but an important distinction to make. The foundations of Resident Evil were in classic B movies and horror films – static cameras allowing staged horror films and classic cinematic techniques, the action is always contained and controlled by the director.

While elements of horror and certain tropes remained in Resident Evil 4, they were no longer the beginning and end of everything, and the fear of walking into a small army of peasants armed with primitive gadgets or just an obvious threat. (like mini-games). – bosses Dr. Salvatore and El Gigante (reminiscent of the threats that followed Mr. X and Nemesis in previous games) proved truly terrifying without the provisions or skills to complete the task. The fear is a fear of jumping around the corner when the cameraman decides to expose it; The terror is finding yourself out of its depth to hear the eerie turn of a nearby chainsaw. To have? There is a difference, okay…

into the unknown

resident Evil

(Image credit: Capcom)

Subscribe to Retro Gamerretro gamer

Psychological horror was still the realm of Silent Hill at the time, with the paranormal stuff that Capcom tried to go against the grain of a series based on its own science of hockey with various virus strains, but trying typical zombies just made the game stale and familiar. . . “At this point in the series, zombies weren’t scary for players anymore,” Kobayashi confirmed. “They had become cannon fodder that you could easily beat. We wanted something that would bring back the unfamiliar and scary feeling unlike any enemy you’ve seen before, and that was the birth of Los Ganados.

The parasitic nature of these new, strictly non-zombie enemies was the light bulb moment Capcom had been waiting for. In addition to giving you complete creative freedom to go crazy with creative new enemy types, from parasite-infected mutated bugs to their once-human hosts who have (or lack) talent for those powerful parasitic companions, it gives you also the creative freedom to go crazy with a new bio-weapon Connect to existing lore as a series of experiences, tick each box, keep clearing the list for a whole new set of terrifying enemies and challenges to overcome.

The premise change was necessary to keep fans from having zombies, but the transition to a more action-focused game was a little less expected. “We took a look back in 2005 at games that were popular in the western market at the time, and it was clear that games that let you aim and shoot with precision in that third-person style are the path to follow.” Reveal Kobayashi.

Resident Evil 4

(Image credit: Capcom)

“Finishing the exact position of the camera behind the player was a very difficult optimization process”

Hiroyuki Kobayashi, producer

Many thought this shooter was the downfall of the poorly received Resident Evil 5, but it turns out the wheels were already in motion a decade ago to generate even more interest in the Western market. Let’s face it, later sequels tended to boldly step into shooter territory, where Resi 4 only shovels a bit (watch out for Del Lago, guys…) but still, if you want to point fingers and name a criminal. For recent twisted action, you’ll find yourself just chasing one of the best games ever made.

It’s easy to accept great game design as it is, and even from the various pre-release versions of the game you can really get an idea of ​​how many different camera placements the team had to go through before decide on this version. Shipped. The beta footage shows a mix of fixed and aim-based cameras, while in this foreground you can see a variety of heights, depths, and angles, all featuring different action sequences.

“Finishing the exact camera position behind the player was a very difficult remedial process,” admits Kobayashi. “It’s only part of the game, but you really have to master it because it affects every other aspect of the game.” Since then, we’ve played countless third-person games where the camera seemed “off” in ways hard to describe – too fast, maybe just a little too far, or maybe too tightly tied to the player character – that’s exactly what Resi 4 did before. This adds more weight to the argument that it’s coming and doing better than many games since. Well done Capcom.

a difficult balance

Resident Evil 4

(Image credit: Capcom)

“We went through four different versions of the game before deciding which direction we wanted to go.”

Hiroyuki Kobayashi, producer

There were other challenges ahead of the team as the game was faster. Players will quickly get used to enjoying encounters that are large in scale (in terms of number or size of enemies) and where the tension of the original games allows for minimal placement of enemies for maximum effect (thus slowing down the speed at which players adapt to each). enemy), appearing in larger groups, and more often than not, something had to be done to keep people from feeling like they had mastered a new type of enemy within minutes.

Pressed for the biggest design challenge during the development of this game, in fact, Kobayashi cites this problem as the main obstacle to the game’s development. “It’s probably the process of determining the type of creatures that should appear in the second half of the game,” he confirmed. “You’re more used to Ganados by then, so it’s a tough balance to keep things interesting while still staying true to the atmosphere of the game.”

Capcom has clearly had its fair share of franchise leadership in this bold new direction, so it’s interesting to see how the team decided to transfer them to the player. An example of this is the inventory system – gone is the simple small grid, where every item, regardless of mass or weight, takes up a slot, replacing it with a much larger grid in the form of a bag attached scalable where the size of the item is determined. How many “blocks” does it occupy?

The current system for micromanaging your inventory was outdated and oversimplified at this point (just get an ink ribbon, a healing item, your primary weapon and spare ammo, leave room to move puzzle pieces ), but this nifty new mechanic got us here. Think about what and why we wear, it becomes a mini-game in itself. “Oddly, Tetris was the inspiration,” laughed Kobayashi. “I thought it would be fun if you got to play a puzzle game where you try to fit the pieces together as best you can with no gaps to maximize efficiency.”

unforgettable encounters

Resident Evil 4

(Image credit: Capcom)

Extended ReadingResident Evil 4 VR Logo Screen

This is why games like the Quantic Dream games continue to use this type of mechanic so heavily, as it allows players to focus on the action and storytelling until the moment they are called upon to act. They’re also well used to Telltale’s spin on the classic point-and-click formula with games like The Walking Dead, and show how Resi 4’s masterclass using QTE continues to infiltrate the market and evolve today.

Kobayashi seems delighted that his game is still so respected 16 years later. “It’s an incredible honor that makes me really happy,” he tells us. “it happened [over] It’s been 10 years since the game came out and it’s great to see how much fans loved the game back then.


This feature first appeared in the magazine’s 150th issue. retro gamer magazine. For more in-depth features, you can get print and digital versions of the latest issue at Journalsdirect.


See more

The making of Resident Evil 4: “By that point in the series, zombies were simply no longer scary to players”

Oddly, the best thing about Resident Evil 4 is that it isn’t really a Resident Evil game. With the established survival horror formula perfected by three PlayStation games and several spin-offs, both the development team and fans wanted something new, something different, something challenging. 
This didn’t come easily for Capcom, with the team exploring supernatural elements and the paranormal in early development as workarounds to the growing zombie fatigue, but it’s hard to argue that the final product wasn’t worth the wait. Eschewing static camera angles for an over-the-shoulder affair that quickly became the staple for third-person shooters and leaving the brain-munching idiots to rot in order to let a parasite-ridden populous take centre stage, this was no longer survival horror – it was survival terror. 
It’s a subtle difference in terms of language, sure, but it’s an important distinction to make. Resident Evil’s foundations were in classic B-movies and horror films – static cameras allowed for staged scares and classic cinematography techniques, the action contained and controlled by the director at all times. 
While elements of horror and certain tropes remained in Resident Evil 4, they were no longer the be-all and end-all and the fear of stumbling into a small army of villagers armed with rudimentary tools or just one obvious threat (the likes of mini-bosses Dr Salvatore and El Gigante reminiscent of stalking threats Mr X and Nemesis in previous games) without the provisions or skills to see the task through proved genuinely terrifying. Horror is a jump scare around the next corner when the cameraman decides to reveal it; terror is finding yourself out of your depth only to hear the ominous revving of a chainsaw nearby. See? There’s a difference, alright… 
Into the unknown

(Image credit: Capcom)
Subscribe to Retro Gamer

Psychological horror was then still very much Silent Hill’s domain, while the paranormal stuff Capcom tried sort of went against the grain of a series grounded in its own hokey science with various strains of virus, yet trying typical zombies only made the game feel stale and familiar. “By that point in the series, zombies were simply no longer scary to players,” Kobayashi confirms. “They had become cannon fodder that you could defeat with ease. We wanted something not like the enemies you’d seen before that would bring back the sense of the unfamiliar and the frightening, and that was the genesis of Los Ganados.” 
The parasite-based nature of these new definitely-not-zombie enemies was the light bulb moment Capcom had been waiting for. As well as granting full creative freedom to go nuts with new and inventive enemy types – from mutated bugs that had been exposed to the parasite to once-human hosts with an aptitude for (or lack thereof) these powerful parasitic friends – it also managed to tie into the existing lore as a new line of biological weapon experiments, ticking every box while still scrubbing the slate clean for a whole new roster of horrible foes and challenges to overcome.
The shift of premise was necessary in order to avoid burning fans out on zombies, but the switch to more action-centric gameplay was a little less expected. “We took a look at games that were popular in the western market at the time, around 2005, and it was clear to us that games which let you aim and shoot with precision in that third-person style were the way to go,” reveals Kobayashi. 

(Image credit: Capcom)

“Getting the position of the camera behind the player just right was a very arduous process of refinement”
Hiroyuki Kobayashi, producer

Many thought this shooter pandering was the downfall of the ill-received Resident Evil 5, but it turns out the wheels were already in motion to develop greater interest in the western market a full decade ago. Granted, later sequels have had a tendency to stride boldly into full-on shooter territory where Resi 4 merely had a bit of a paddle (be careful of Del Lago, guys…) but still, if you want to point fingers and name a culprit for the recent action bent, you’ll only find yourself prosecuting one of the greatest games ever made. 
It’s all too easy to take great game design for granted, and even from the various pre-release builds of the game, you can really get a feel for just how many different camera placements the team must have gone through before settling on the version that shipped. Beta footage shows a hybrid of fixed and aim-based cameras, while you can see various heights, depths and angles that all offer different takes on the action in that early footage. 
“Getting the position of the camera behind the player just right was a very arduous process of refinement,” Kobayashi admits. “It’s just one part of the game but you really need to nail it as it influences every other aspect of the gameplay.” Ever since, we’ve played countless third-person games where the camera just feels ‘off’ in a way that’s hard to describe – too floaty, perhaps, just slightly too far away or maybe too stiffly attached to the player character – which just adds more weight to the argument that Resi 4 did this better than pretty much all games that had come before and indeed many since. Way to go, Capcom.
A difficult balance

(Image credit: Capcom)

“We went through four different versions of the game before settling on the direction in which we wanted to go.”

Hiroyuki Kobayashi, producer

There were other challenges ahead of the team due to the quicker pace of the game, too. Players would quickly grow used to enjoying huge-scale encounters (either in terms of enemy numbers or sheer size) and where the tension of the original games allowed for minimal enemy placement for maximum effect (thus slowing the rate at which players could adapt to each enemy), having them appear in bigger groups and more frequently meant that something had to be done to avoid having people feel they had mastered a new enemy type in a matter of minutes. 
When pressed for the greatest design challenge during development of this game, in fact, Kobayashi cites this exact issue as the main hurdle in the game’s development. “Probably the process of working out what kind of creatures should show up in the second half of the game,” he confirms. “By that point, you’ve become more accustomed to Ganados so keeping things interesting while remaining true to the atmosphere of the game is a difficult balance.” 
Capcom clearly had its fair share of challenges in steering the franchise in this bold new direction, so it’s interesting how the team decided to pass these onto the player. One such example of this is the inventory system – gone is the simplistic small grid where every item, regardless of bulk or weight, takes up one slot, replaced by a much larger grid in the form of the upgradeable attache case, where item size determines how many ‘blocks’ it takes up. 
The existing system for micromanaging your inventory had become stale and overly simple by this point (just take an Ink Ribbon, a healing item, your primary weapon and some reserve ammo, leaving room for ferrying puzzle items around) but this ingenious new mechanic made us think about what we were carrying and why, becoming almost a mini-game in its own right. “Funnily enough, Tetris was the inspiration,” Kobayashi laughs. “I thought it would be fun if you had to play a puzzle game where you tried to fit the pieces in together as best you could without any gaps to maximise efficiency.”
Memorable encounters

(Image credit: Capcom)
Extended Reading

That’s the reason games like those made by Quantic Dream continue to employ such mechanics so heavily, as it leaves players free to focus on action and narrative until such a time as they are called upon to take action. They’re also used to decent effect in Telltale’s twist on the classic point-and-click formula with games like The Walking Dead, showcasing how Resi 4’s masterclass in QTE use continues to permeate the market and evolve today. 
Kobayashi seems delighted that his game is still so revered 16 years later. “It’s an incredible honour that makes me very happy indeed,” he tells us. “It’s been [over] 10 years since the game came out, and it’s great to see how much the fans have loved the game in that time.”
This feature first appeared in issue 150 of Retro Gamer magazine. For more excellent in-depth features, you can pick up print and digital versions of the latest issue from Magazinesdirect. 

#making #Resident #Evil #point #series #zombies #simply #longer #scary #players

The making of Resident Evil 4: “By that point in the series, zombies were simply no longer scary to players”

Oddly, the best thing about Resident Evil 4 is that it isn’t really a Resident Evil game. With the established survival horror formula perfected by three PlayStation games and several spin-offs, both the development team and fans wanted something new, something different, something challenging. 
This didn’t come easily for Capcom, with the team exploring supernatural elements and the paranormal in early development as workarounds to the growing zombie fatigue, but it’s hard to argue that the final product wasn’t worth the wait. Eschewing static camera angles for an over-the-shoulder affair that quickly became the staple for third-person shooters and leaving the brain-munching idiots to rot in order to let a parasite-ridden populous take centre stage, this was no longer survival horror – it was survival terror. 
It’s a subtle difference in terms of language, sure, but it’s an important distinction to make. Resident Evil’s foundations were in classic B-movies and horror films – static cameras allowed for staged scares and classic cinematography techniques, the action contained and controlled by the director at all times. 
While elements of horror and certain tropes remained in Resident Evil 4, they were no longer the be-all and end-all and the fear of stumbling into a small army of villagers armed with rudimentary tools or just one obvious threat (the likes of mini-bosses Dr Salvatore and El Gigante reminiscent of stalking threats Mr X and Nemesis in previous games) without the provisions or skills to see the task through proved genuinely terrifying. Horror is a jump scare around the next corner when the cameraman decides to reveal it; terror is finding yourself out of your depth only to hear the ominous revving of a chainsaw nearby. See? There’s a difference, alright… 
Into the unknown

(Image credit: Capcom)
Subscribe to Retro Gamer

Psychological horror was then still very much Silent Hill’s domain, while the paranormal stuff Capcom tried sort of went against the grain of a series grounded in its own hokey science with various strains of virus, yet trying typical zombies only made the game feel stale and familiar. “By that point in the series, zombies were simply no longer scary to players,” Kobayashi confirms. “They had become cannon fodder that you could defeat with ease. We wanted something not like the enemies you’d seen before that would bring back the sense of the unfamiliar and the frightening, and that was the genesis of Los Ganados.” 
The parasite-based nature of these new definitely-not-zombie enemies was the light bulb moment Capcom had been waiting for. As well as granting full creative freedom to go nuts with new and inventive enemy types – from mutated bugs that had been exposed to the parasite to once-human hosts with an aptitude for (or lack thereof) these powerful parasitic friends – it also managed to tie into the existing lore as a new line of biological weapon experiments, ticking every box while still scrubbing the slate clean for a whole new roster of horrible foes and challenges to overcome.
The shift of premise was necessary in order to avoid burning fans out on zombies, but the switch to more action-centric gameplay was a little less expected. “We took a look at games that were popular in the western market at the time, around 2005, and it was clear to us that games which let you aim and shoot with precision in that third-person style were the way to go,” reveals Kobayashi. 

(Image credit: Capcom)

“Getting the position of the camera behind the player just right was a very arduous process of refinement”
Hiroyuki Kobayashi, producer

Many thought this shooter pandering was the downfall of the ill-received Resident Evil 5, but it turns out the wheels were already in motion to develop greater interest in the western market a full decade ago. Granted, later sequels have had a tendency to stride boldly into full-on shooter territory where Resi 4 merely had a bit of a paddle (be careful of Del Lago, guys…) but still, if you want to point fingers and name a culprit for the recent action bent, you’ll only find yourself prosecuting one of the greatest games ever made. 
It’s all too easy to take great game design for granted, and even from the various pre-release builds of the game, you can really get a feel for just how many different camera placements the team must have gone through before settling on the version that shipped. Beta footage shows a hybrid of fixed and aim-based cameras, while you can see various heights, depths and angles that all offer different takes on the action in that early footage. 
“Getting the position of the camera behind the player just right was a very arduous process of refinement,” Kobayashi admits. “It’s just one part of the game but you really need to nail it as it influences every other aspect of the gameplay.” Ever since, we’ve played countless third-person games where the camera just feels ‘off’ in a way that’s hard to describe – too floaty, perhaps, just slightly too far away or maybe too stiffly attached to the player character – which just adds more weight to the argument that Resi 4 did this better than pretty much all games that had come before and indeed many since. Way to go, Capcom.
A difficult balance

(Image credit: Capcom)

“We went through four different versions of the game before settling on the direction in which we wanted to go.”

Hiroyuki Kobayashi, producer

There were other challenges ahead of the team due to the quicker pace of the game, too. Players would quickly grow used to enjoying huge-scale encounters (either in terms of enemy numbers or sheer size) and where the tension of the original games allowed for minimal enemy placement for maximum effect (thus slowing the rate at which players could adapt to each enemy), having them appear in bigger groups and more frequently meant that something had to be done to avoid having people feel they had mastered a new enemy type in a matter of minutes. 
When pressed for the greatest design challenge during development of this game, in fact, Kobayashi cites this exact issue as the main hurdle in the game’s development. “Probably the process of working out what kind of creatures should show up in the second half of the game,” he confirms. “By that point, you’ve become more accustomed to Ganados so keeping things interesting while remaining true to the atmosphere of the game is a difficult balance.” 
Capcom clearly had its fair share of challenges in steering the franchise in this bold new direction, so it’s interesting how the team decided to pass these onto the player. One such example of this is the inventory system – gone is the simplistic small grid where every item, regardless of bulk or weight, takes up one slot, replaced by a much larger grid in the form of the upgradeable attache case, where item size determines how many ‘blocks’ it takes up. 
The existing system for micromanaging your inventory had become stale and overly simple by this point (just take an Ink Ribbon, a healing item, your primary weapon and some reserve ammo, leaving room for ferrying puzzle items around) but this ingenious new mechanic made us think about what we were carrying and why, becoming almost a mini-game in its own right. “Funnily enough, Tetris was the inspiration,” Kobayashi laughs. “I thought it would be fun if you had to play a puzzle game where you tried to fit the pieces in together as best you could without any gaps to maximise efficiency.”
Memorable encounters

(Image credit: Capcom)
Extended Reading

That’s the reason games like those made by Quantic Dream continue to employ such mechanics so heavily, as it leaves players free to focus on action and narrative until such a time as they are called upon to take action. They’re also used to decent effect in Telltale’s twist on the classic point-and-click formula with games like The Walking Dead, showcasing how Resi 4’s masterclass in QTE use continues to permeate the market and evolve today. 
Kobayashi seems delighted that his game is still so revered 16 years later. “It’s an incredible honour that makes me very happy indeed,” he tells us. “It’s been [over] 10 years since the game came out, and it’s great to see how much the fans have loved the game in that time.”
This feature first appeared in issue 150 of Retro Gamer magazine. For more excellent in-depth features, you can pick up print and digital versions of the latest issue from Magazinesdirect. 

#making #Resident #Evil #point #series #zombies #simply #longer #scary #players


Synthetic: Ôn Thi HSG

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *

Back to top button