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The Orville: 10 Unpopular Opinions, According To Reddit

After debuting originally on Fox like Seth MacFarlane’s other animated projects, The Orville made the jump to Hulu (and streaming) for its third season. Considering it had been rescued from cancellation once before, longtime fans took this to be a good sign.

To fans like ZaphodBeeblebrox2019 there’s nothing to celebrate. “It should’ve been cancelled, ” they state, “instead of moving to Hulu…Even if the show stays in production, I highly doubt it will be recognizable in a year or two.” With a new home on a prominent streaming platform, The Orville will be able to make up for any fans who decide to jump ship rather than give it a chance.

The Design Of The Ship Is Ugly

The design of the USS Orville is certainly unique, carving a space for itself among prominent starships in the genre of sci-fi television, while still sharing some common ground with the coolest Star Trek starships like the USS Voyager.

According to loz_64, “The design of the ship is ugly. I especially don’t like the engine loops in the back; makes the ship look like some kind of weird sandal.” The engine loops might be peculiar, but that’s what sets it apart visually from the likes of the starship Enterprise. Its design also highlights the often quirky intersection of form and function found throughout franchises like Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica. 

Alara Is Better Off The Ship

Even as a Xelayan, one of the strongest races in The Orville, Alara had to prove that her age and inexperience wouldn’t affect her ability to be chief of security. When she left the ship, she was replaced by Talia, who was older and more competent, but far less charismatic.

UPRC believes that, “The Orville (ship, not show) is better off without Alara. I feel like having her off the ship is for the better.” Fans like ironmanmk42 disagrees, thinking they should “get rid of annoying Talia and bring back alara.” Sometimes a character who’s better for a show isn’t good for a ship, but sometimes a character who’s good for a ship isn’t necessarily better for a show.

It Should Stop Having Star Trek Cameos

From the very first season, Seth MacFarlane made his reverence for Star Trek very clear, and even went so far as to include cameos by well-known Star Trek actors in his series. As time has gone on, the actors — and their voices — have been so recognizable that it’s been necessary to cover them with alien prosthetics to integrate them into storylines.

Blues2112 thinks, “we don’t need EVERY former Star Trek actor to make guest appearances on the show! Let the show stand on it’s own ad a separate entity.” Given how much care MacFarlane and his team have taken in placing these actors into The Orville universe in an organic way, even going so far as to obscure their recognizable features, there’s less of a chance that viewers will make the same instanteous connection to their other media as in the first season.

It’s Too Dramatic

Given how much music and joyful cursing is found throughout The Orville, no one would mistake it for anything other than a Seth MacFarlane show, and given its creator’s track record with Family Guy and American Dad, it also isn’t considered an overly dramatic series in the slightest.

Teatreevelvet thinks that there’s “too much drama,” citing a lack of “balance of light, fun comedy to add to it all.” Season 2 of The Orville has been more serious than season 1, especially with tackling relevant issues like gender and sexuality, but the trademark buoyancy of Seth MacFarlane’s sense of humor continues to break the tension such examinations might cause.

Bortus & Klyden Are Bad Characters

Much like Commander Stamets and Doctor Culber on Star Trek: Discovery, Bortus and Klyden are part of a same-sex relationship that is treated with the same triumphs and tribulations as any other relationship. Bortus in particular is frequently thought of as one of the best characters on The Orville, and Klyden has a lot of tragic flaws that make him feel fallible.

“My unpopular opinion,” states StarshipJedi117, “is that I strongly dislike Bortus and Klyden. I don’t like them. At all.” With their dispositions as Moclans, the characters have always been gruff, and Klyden has been part of storylines that make him particularly unlikable, but their reserved presence provides a valuable juxtaposition to the frivolity of the rest of the series.

The Kaylon Invasion Was A Low Point For The Series

The Kaylon Invasion was a principal threat in season 2, and in all the trailers for season 3, it appears that the Planetary Union will still be in the throws of the conflict. The Kaylons are to The Orville as the Borg are to Star Trek: The Next Generation and fans are excited to see what happens next.

To i_dig_downvotes, “The Kaylon invasion episodes were the low point of the series,” but to fans like newPhoenixz, “it actually was a highlight of the season.” The Kaylon Invasion offered a rare opportunity for The Orville to up the stakes significantly, highlight epic space battles, and reveal a tense side of the series to counteract all its jocundity.

It’s Should Ditch The Late 20th Century Pop-Culture

While it’s no secret how much The Orville borrows from Star Trek, from its basic plot to its uniforms and storylines, one particular nod to the popular sci-fi series has always been its love of pop culture that predates its current timeline by several hundred years. It only makes sense that Captain Mercer would have a Kermit the Frog doll, which he’s specifically stated gives him the inspiration to lead a “ragtag group of misfits.”

The biggest issue tebower81 has with The Orville is “that they are too obsessed with late 20th-century pop culture. It almost breaks my suspension of disbelief.” Given its many homages to Star Trek, it’s not surprising that the crew mention 20th-century pop culture in the same way that Captain Jean Luc Picard loved Shakespeare on Star Trek: The Next Generation. 

It’s Better Than Any Current Star Trek

When discussion of The Orville compares it with current Star Trek series, fans like CooperHChurch427 go “insane when a person says “The ‘real’ Star Trek” is back.” To do so ignores that every Star Trek television series has been reflective of the social, cultural, and political framework of its time, making each one distinctly unique.

Fans like Mr_woodles123 think that because The Orville’s “storylines are more fleshed out, and the concepts for individual episodes are really interesting,” it’s more engrossing than current Star Trek series because they’re  “just doing the same cookie-cutter stories they’ve been doing since the late 80’s.” To make such sweeping generalizations ignores the fact that each series reflects different socio-political inspirations, such as grounding in current cultural movements like Black Lives Matter for Star Trek: Discovery or the end of the Cold War for Star Trek: The Next Generation.

It’s Not Very Original

The Orville may borrow from Star Trek and other sci-fi series, but with its amalgamation of space exploration and satirical humor, it’s self-referential enough to make it stand out among shows that take themselves too seriously.

Redtex thinks that The Orville is “an absolutely abysmal, non-original piece of sh*t series that offends pretty much any true sci-fi fans’ sensibilities and intellect. This show should be scraped off the shoes of humanity.” Since the series is an homage to shows sci-fi fans love, rather than a critique, it’s rare to find this vehement condemnation among the fandom.


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The Orville: 10 Unpopular Opinions, According To Reddit

After debuting originally on Fox like Seth MacFarlane’s other animated projects, The Orville made the jump to Hulu (and streaming) for its third season. Considering it had been rescued from cancellation once before, longtime fans took this to be a good sign.
To fans like ZaphodBeeblebrox2019 there’s nothing to celebrate. “It should’ve been cancelled, ” they state, “instead of moving to Hulu…Even if the show stays in production, I highly doubt it will be recognizable in a year or two.” With a new home on a prominent streaming platform, The Orville will be able to make up for any fans who decide to jump ship rather than give it a chance.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr2’); });

The Design Of The Ship Is Ugly

The design of the USS Orville is certainly unique, carving a space for itself among prominent starships in the genre of sci-fi television, while still sharing some common ground with the coolest Star Trek starships like the USS Voyager.
According to loz_64, “The design of the ship is ugly. I especially don’t like the engine loops in the back; makes the ship look like some kind of weird sandal.” The engine loops might be peculiar, but that’s what sets it apart visually from the likes of the starship Enterprise. Its design also highlights the often quirky intersection of form and function found throughout franchises like Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica. 

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Alara Is Better Off The Ship

Even as a Xelayan, one of the strongest races in The Orville, Alara had to prove that her age and inexperience wouldn’t affect her ability to be chief of security. When she left the ship, she was replaced by Talia, who was older and more competent, but far less charismatic.
UPRC believes that, “The Orville (ship, not show) is better off without Alara. I feel like having her off the ship is for the better.” Fans like ironmanmk42 disagrees, thinking they should “get rid of annoying Talia and bring back alara.” Sometimes a character who’s better for a show isn’t good for a ship, but sometimes a character who’s good for a ship isn’t necessarily better for a show.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

It Should Stop Having Star Trek Cameos

From the very first season, Seth MacFarlane made his reverence for Star Trek very clear, and even went so far as to include cameos by well-known Star Trek actors in his series. As time has gone on, the actors — and their voices — have been so recognizable that it’s been necessary to cover them with alien prosthetics to integrate them into storylines.
Blues2112 thinks, “we don’t need EVERY former Star Trek actor to make guest appearances on the show! Let the show stand on it’s own ad a separate entity.” Given how much care MacFarlane and his team have taken in placing these actors into The Orville universe in an organic way, even going so far as to obscure their recognizable features, there’s less of a chance that viewers will make the same instanteous connection to their other media as in the first season.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

It’s Too Dramatic

Given how much music and joyful cursing is found throughout The Orville, no one would mistake it for anything other than a Seth MacFarlane show, and given its creator’s track record with Family Guy and American Dad, it also isn’t considered an overly dramatic series in the slightest.
Teatreevelvet thinks that there’s “too much drama,” citing a lack of “balance of light, fun comedy to add to it all.” Season 2 of The Orville has been more serious than season 1, especially with tackling relevant issues like gender and sexuality, but the trademark buoyancy of Seth MacFarlane’s sense of humor continues to break the tension such examinations might cause.
Bortus & Klyden Are Bad Characters

Much like Commander Stamets and Doctor Culber on Star Trek: Discovery, Bortus and Klyden are part of a same-sex relationship that is treated with the same triumphs and tribulations as any other relationship. Bortus in particular is frequently thought of as one of the best characters on The Orville, and Klyden has a lot of tragic flaws that make him feel fallible.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT6’); });

“My unpopular opinion,” states StarshipJedi117, “is that I strongly dislike Bortus and Klyden. I don’t like them. At all.” With their dispositions as Moclans, the characters have always been gruff, and Klyden has been part of storylines that make him particularly unlikable, but their reserved presence provides a valuable juxtaposition to the frivolity of the rest of the series.
The Kaylon Invasion Was A Low Point For The Series

The Kaylon Invasion was a principal threat in season 2, and in all the trailers for season 3, it appears that the Planetary Union will still be in the throws of the conflict. The Kaylons are to The Orville as the Borg are to Star Trek: The Next Generation and fans are excited to see what happens next.
To i_dig_downvotes, “The Kaylon invasion episodes were the low point of the series,” but to fans like newPhoenixz, “it actually was a highlight of the season.” The Kaylon Invasion offered a rare opportunity for The Orville to up the stakes significantly, highlight epic space battles, and reveal a tense side of the series to counteract all its jocundity.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT7’); });

It’s Should Ditch The Late 20th Century Pop-Culture

While it’s no secret how much The Orville borrows from Star Trek, from its basic plot to its uniforms and storylines, one particular nod to the popular sci-fi series has always been its love of pop culture that predates its current timeline by several hundred years. It only makes sense that Captain Mercer would have a Kermit the Frog doll, which he’s specifically stated gives him the inspiration to lead a “ragtag group of misfits.”
The biggest issue tebower81 has with The Orville is “that they are too obsessed with late 20th-century pop culture. It almost breaks my suspension of disbelief.” Given its many homages to Star Trek, it’s not surprising that the crew mention 20th-century pop culture in the same way that Captain Jean Luc Picard loved Shakespeare on Star Trek: The Next Generation. 
It’s Better Than Any Current Star Trek

When discussion of The Orville compares it with current Star Trek series, fans like CooperHChurch427 go “insane when a person says “The ‘real’ Star Trek” is back.” To do so ignores that every Star Trek television series has been reflective of the social, cultural, and political framework of its time, making each one distinctly unique.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT8’); });

Fans like Mr_woodles123 think that because The Orville’s “storylines are more fleshed out, and the concepts for individual episodes are really interesting,” it’s more engrossing than current Star Trek series because they’re  “just doing the same cookie-cutter stories they’ve been doing since the late 80’s.” To make such sweeping generalizations ignores the fact that each series reflects different socio-political inspirations, such as grounding in current cultural movements like Black Lives Matter for Star Trek: Discovery or the end of the Cold War for Star Trek: The Next Generation.
It’s Not Very Original

The Orville may borrow from Star Trek and other sci-fi series, but with its amalgamation of space exploration and satirical humor, it’s self-referential enough to make it stand out among shows that take themselves too seriously.
Redtex thinks that The Orville is “an absolutely abysmal, non-original piece of sh*t series that offends pretty much any true sci-fi fans’ sensibilities and intellect. This show should be scraped off the shoes of humanity.” Since the series is an homage to shows sci-fi fans love, rather than a critique, it’s rare to find this vehement condemnation among the fandom.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT9’); });

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Orville #Unpopular #Opinions #Reddit

The Orville: 10 Unpopular Opinions, According To Reddit

After debuting originally on Fox like Seth MacFarlane’s other animated projects, The Orville made the jump to Hulu (and streaming) for its third season. Considering it had been rescued from cancellation once before, longtime fans took this to be a good sign.
To fans like ZaphodBeeblebrox2019 there’s nothing to celebrate. “It should’ve been cancelled, ” they state, “instead of moving to Hulu…Even if the show stays in production, I highly doubt it will be recognizable in a year or two.” With a new home on a prominent streaming platform, The Orville will be able to make up for any fans who decide to jump ship rather than give it a chance.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr2’); });

The Design Of The Ship Is Ugly

The design of the USS Orville is certainly unique, carving a space for itself among prominent starships in the genre of sci-fi television, while still sharing some common ground with the coolest Star Trek starships like the USS Voyager.
According to loz_64, “The design of the ship is ugly. I especially don’t like the engine loops in the back; makes the ship look like some kind of weird sandal.” The engine loops might be peculiar, but that’s what sets it apart visually from the likes of the starship Enterprise. Its design also highlights the often quirky intersection of form and function found throughout franchises like Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica. 

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr3’); });

Alara Is Better Off The Ship

Even as a Xelayan, one of the strongest races in The Orville, Alara had to prove that her age and inexperience wouldn’t affect her ability to be chief of security. When she left the ship, she was replaced by Talia, who was older and more competent, but far less charismatic.
UPRC believes that, “The Orville (ship, not show) is better off without Alara. I feel like having her off the ship is for the better.” Fans like ironmanmk42 disagrees, thinking they should “get rid of annoying Talia and bring back alara.” Sometimes a character who’s better for a show isn’t good for a ship, but sometimes a character who’s good for a ship isn’t necessarily better for a show.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr4’); });

It Should Stop Having Star Trek Cameos

From the very first season, Seth MacFarlane made his reverence for Star Trek very clear, and even went so far as to include cameos by well-known Star Trek actors in his series. As time has gone on, the actors — and their voices — have been so recognizable that it’s been necessary to cover them with alien prosthetics to integrate them into storylines.
Blues2112 thinks, “we don’t need EVERY former Star Trek actor to make guest appearances on the show! Let the show stand on it’s own ad a separate entity.” Given how much care MacFarlane and his team have taken in placing these actors into The Orville universe in an organic way, even going so far as to obscure their recognizable features, there’s less of a chance that viewers will make the same instanteous connection to their other media as in the first season.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr5’); });

It’s Too Dramatic

Given how much music and joyful cursing is found throughout The Orville, no one would mistake it for anything other than a Seth MacFarlane show, and given its creator’s track record with Family Guy and American Dad, it also isn’t considered an overly dramatic series in the slightest.
Teatreevelvet thinks that there’s “too much drama,” citing a lack of “balance of light, fun comedy to add to it all.” Season 2 of The Orville has been more serious than season 1, especially with tackling relevant issues like gender and sexuality, but the trademark buoyancy of Seth MacFarlane’s sense of humor continues to break the tension such examinations might cause.
Bortus & Klyden Are Bad Characters

Much like Commander Stamets and Doctor Culber on Star Trek: Discovery, Bortus and Klyden are part of a same-sex relationship that is treated with the same triumphs and tribulations as any other relationship. Bortus in particular is frequently thought of as one of the best characters on The Orville, and Klyden has a lot of tragic flaws that make him feel fallible.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT6’); });

“My unpopular opinion,” states StarshipJedi117, “is that I strongly dislike Bortus and Klyden. I don’t like them. At all.” With their dispositions as Moclans, the characters have always been gruff, and Klyden has been part of storylines that make him particularly unlikable, but their reserved presence provides a valuable juxtaposition to the frivolity of the rest of the series.
The Kaylon Invasion Was A Low Point For The Series

The Kaylon Invasion was a principal threat in season 2, and in all the trailers for season 3, it appears that the Planetary Union will still be in the throws of the conflict. The Kaylons are to The Orville as the Borg are to Star Trek: The Next Generation and fans are excited to see what happens next.
To i_dig_downvotes, “The Kaylon invasion episodes were the low point of the series,” but to fans like newPhoenixz, “it actually was a highlight of the season.” The Kaylon Invasion offered a rare opportunity for The Orville to up the stakes significantly, highlight epic space battles, and reveal a tense side of the series to counteract all its jocundity.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT7’); });

It’s Should Ditch The Late 20th Century Pop-Culture

While it’s no secret how much The Orville borrows from Star Trek, from its basic plot to its uniforms and storylines, one particular nod to the popular sci-fi series has always been its love of pop culture that predates its current timeline by several hundred years. It only makes sense that Captain Mercer would have a Kermit the Frog doll, which he’s specifically stated gives him the inspiration to lead a “ragtag group of misfits.”
The biggest issue tebower81 has with The Orville is “that they are too obsessed with late 20th-century pop culture. It almost breaks my suspension of disbelief.” Given its many homages to Star Trek, it’s not surprising that the crew mention 20th-century pop culture in the same way that Captain Jean Luc Picard loved Shakespeare on Star Trek: The Next Generation. 
It’s Better Than Any Current Star Trek

When discussion of The Orville compares it with current Star Trek series, fans like CooperHChurch427 go “insane when a person says “The ‘real’ Star Trek” is back.” To do so ignores that every Star Trek television series has been reflective of the social, cultural, and political framework of its time, making each one distinctly unique.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT8’); });

Fans like Mr_woodles123 think that because The Orville’s “storylines are more fleshed out, and the concepts for individual episodes are really interesting,” it’s more engrossing than current Star Trek series because they’re  “just doing the same cookie-cutter stories they’ve been doing since the late 80’s.” To make such sweeping generalizations ignores the fact that each series reflects different socio-political inspirations, such as grounding in current cultural movements like Black Lives Matter for Star Trek: Discovery or the end of the Cold War for Star Trek: The Next Generation.
It’s Not Very Original

The Orville may borrow from Star Trek and other sci-fi series, but with its amalgamation of space exploration and satirical humor, it’s self-referential enough to make it stand out among shows that take themselves too seriously.
Redtex thinks that The Orville is “an absolutely abysmal, non-original piece of sh*t series that offends pretty much any true sci-fi fans’ sensibilities and intellect. This show should be scraped off the shoes of humanity.” Since the series is an homage to shows sci-fi fans love, rather than a critique, it’s rare to find this vehement condemnation among the fandom.

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1535570269372-ccr-REPEAT9’); });

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1550597677810-0’); });

#Orville #Unpopular #Opinions #Reddit


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