Entertainment

With Guilty Gear Strive, Arc System Works is pushing for the next evolution of its beloved fighting franchise

For fighting game fans, Arc System Works needs no introduction. The mainline Guilty Gear and Blazblue series (from PS1 and PS3, respectively) have dominated fighting game tournaments like EVO for years. On top of that, the studio has produced some impressive franchise-led efforts in the form of Persona 4 Arena, Dragon Ball FighterZ, and Granblue Fantasy Versus. Now, with Guilty Gear Strive (the “iv” in the title signifies the series’ fourth true iteration), the fighting game studio is immediately bringing the genre back to the drawing board.

“Throughout Guilty Gear’s 20-year history, the goal has been to make each update more exciting and impactful than the last,” says Daisuke Ishiwatari, Creator and Chief Creative Officer of Guilty Gear Strive. “We tried to smooth things out a bit with Guilty Gear Xrd, but that didn’t solve the series’ main problem – the skill gap between veteran players and those new to the series.”

Arc games are known for being fast and technical, with a high skill ceiling, all bright lights and contrasting colors that require fragile reflexes to master. But over the years it has worked to make fighters more user-friendly by adding more detailed tutorials and new modes that make combos easier without taking too much control.

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“The problem was that even though Guilty Gear Xrd was designed as an all-new game, the skill gap between series veterans and newcomers was still huge. [One thing] What we’re doing right now is looking carefully at a number of things to lay a new foundation for long-time players and newbies alike.”

With Strive, Guilty Gear is getting a major mechanical overhaul to address its complexity. “The goal is not to simplify complex mechanics or make gameplay easier. To be successful, players will need to develop advanced skills and have a deep understanding of the game,” says Ishiwatari. be difficult to understand from the start.

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However, to get the most out of a character’s movement, you still need to practice it. “We are working to make this a completely new experience for all players,” says Ishiwatari. “However, we aim to ensure that elements unique to Guilty Gear, such as the freedom and ability to express individuality through gameplay, are still felt.”

risk versus reward

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From this point on, if a viewer can understand the flow of the game, they can be further encouraged to purchase a pad for themselves. Although Strive aims to be more accessible, that doesn’t mean it’s discounted. Rather, there are slightly tighter back and forths than before, and there are system tweaks that force you to focus on battling opponents with your attack rather than dodging fear. The new RISC system is a way to push players forward, blocks gradually lose their effect as you take hits, meaning you should always be aware of potential openings.

The series’ first foray into scene transitions is another way the team is trying to encourage more back-and-forth for all players. “In most fighting games, squeezing your opponent to the edge of the screen gives you a huge advantage, and one of the most exciting parts of the match is when attacking players make the most of the moment,” says Ishiwatari. . “However, I feel like there’s a huge difference between getting a good combo and locking someone up forever. In previous versions of Guilty Gear, there were times when the defensive player didn’t have No other choice. One of the goals of the new game is to retain the concepts of superior execution and challenging gameplay while retaining the concept of this type of gameplay to get out of dead ends faster.

guilty equipment effort

Scene transitions are part of Strive’s visual enhancement to Guilty Gear. Push your opponent back and the camera zooms, rotates and follows the action. The series has gone from some of the best pixel art on PS1 and PS2 to 3D anime-in-motion style on Xrd.

“[In Xrd] The focus was on recreating the feel and visual impact of Japanese anime,” says Ishiwatari. “We’ve implemented new camera moves for Guilty Gear Strive that weren’t available in the previous version. We’ve also added visual weight to all characters to make them more visible on screen, and enlarged the backgrounds. shots to give the camera more freedom of movement.

The passing game feels more than jerky at times (although most characters are still running at high speed). Get a good meter and the camera will zoom in to highlight the conflict, while a special move will see you approach a character and show all the detail on their faces. The rock song that introduced the new game was Smell Of The Game (listen for yourself at bit.ly/opm-trige). Heavy guitar sounds have always been on par with the series. It is part of his nature. This energy now carries everything.

“Our goal when creating this song was to convey the wild atmosphere of the drama,” Ishiwatari said.[the] the excitement of the beginning of a new world and [to] We’re determined not to lose core game functionality.” We can’t wait to see what the new Guilty Gear brings, and we’re sure other fighting games should take notice. There is nothing to feel guilty about.


Looking for the latest information on PS5 and PS4? Then you will want Subscribe to the official PlayStation magazine for direct delivery to your door and check-out Direct Reviews for all the latest offers.


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With Guilty Gear Strive, Arc System Works is pushing for the next evolution of its beloved fighting franchise

For fighting game fans, Arc System Works needs no introduction. Its core series, Guilty Gear and Blazblue (which started on PS1 and PS3 respectively), have dominated fighting game tournaments like EVO for years now. On top of that the studio’s produced some impressive franchise-led efforts in the shapes of Persona 4 Arena, Dragon Ball FighterZ, and Granblue Fantasy Versus. Now with Guilty Gear Strive (the “iv” in the title is meant to denote the fourth true iteration of the series) the fighting game studio is taking the genre right back to the drawing board. 
“Over Guilty Gear’s 20-year history, the focus was to make each update more exciting and impactful than the last,” says Daisuke Ishiwatari, the series’ creator and chief creative officer on Guilty Gear Strive. “We tried to tone it down somewhat with Guilty Gear Xrd, but it didn’t address the main issue with the series – the gap in ability between veteran players and those new to the franchise.” 
Arc’s games are known for being fast-paced and technical, with a high skill ceiling, all bright lights and clashing colours that require twitchy reflexes to master. But over the years it’s been working to make fighters friendlier by including more in-depth tutorials and new modes that assist with combos without taking away too much control. 

“The problem was that the ability gap between series veterans and beginners was still too large, even though Guilty Gear Xrd was intended to be a brand-new title. [One thing] we are doing now is taking a hard look at a number of things in order to establish a new baseline for long-time players and newcomers to start from.”
With Strive, Guilty Gear is undergoing a big mechanical overhaul to address its complex nature. “The goal is not to simplify complex mechanics or make the game easier. To excel, players will still need to develop advanced skills and an in-depth understanding of the game,” says Ishiwatari. “Our games have the reputation of being hard to understand from the very beginning.”  
Putting on a show

That said, you still have to put in practice to be able to eke all you can from a character’s moveset. “We are working on making it an entirely new experience for all players,” says Ishiwatari. “However, we intend to make it such that players can still feel elements distinctive to Guilty Gear, such as freedom and the ability to express their individuality through the game.” 
Risc versus reward 

From that point, if a viewer can understand the flow of the game, they might be more encouraged to pick up a pad for themselves. While Strive is aiming to be more approachable, that doesn’t mean it’s being pared down. If anything, it has some more tense back-and-forths than before, with tweaks to the system that force you to focus on countering opponents with your offence rather than running scared. The new RISC system is one way players are pushed forward, with blocks gradually losing effectiveness the more hits you take, meaning you always have to be aware of potential openings. 
The series’ first foray into stage transitions is another way the team is trying to encourage more of that back-and-forth for all players. “In most fighting games, trapping your opponent at the edge of the screen gives you a huge advantage, and one of the most exciting parts of the match is for attacking players to come out with the best result in this moment,” shares Ishiwatari. “However, I feel that there is a huge difference between getting a good combo in and just endlessly trapping someone in the corner. In previous editions of Guilty Gear, there were times when the player on defence had no options. One of the goals for the new title is to break those kinds of deadlocks faster while preserving the concepts of superior execution and challenging gameplay.” 

The stage transitions are part of the way Strive is evolving Guilty Gear visually too. Knock your opponent back and the camera zooms in, spins around, and follows the action. The series has gone from having some of the best pixel art around on PS1 and PS2 to 3D anime- in-motion style in Xrd.
“[In Xrd] the focus was to recreate the feeling and visual impact of Japanese anime,” says Ishiwatari. “For Guilty Gear Strive, we’ve implemented new camera movements not present in the previous version. We’ve also added visual weight to all the characters so they appear more substantial on the screen and expanded the backgrounds to allow the camera more freedom of movement.” 
There’s more of a sense of impact than the sometimes floaty last game had (though many of the characters still dash around at high speed). Pull off a good counter and the camera will zoom in to highlight the clash, while a special move will see it come close to a character, showing off all the detail in their faces. The rockin’ song that introduced the new game was Smell Of The Game (hear it for yourself at bit.ly/opm- strive). Heavy guitar sounds have always gone hand-in-hand with the series. It’s just a part of its nature. That energy is now carrying through everything. 
“What we were aiming for by creating this song was to describe the wild atmosphere of the series,” says Ishiwatari, “[the] excitement of a beginning of a new world, and [to] set our mind not to lose the essential qualities of the game.” We look forward to seeing what the new Guilty Gear brings, and we’re sure other fighting games should be taking note. That’s nothing to feel guilty about.
Looking for the latest information on the PS5 and PS4? Then you’ll want to subscribe to Official PlayStation Magazine to get it delivered straight to your doorstep, and check out Magazines Direct for all of the latest offers. 

#Guilty #Gear #Strive #Arc #System #Works #pushing #evolution #beloved #fighting #franchise

With Guilty Gear Strive, Arc System Works is pushing for the next evolution of its beloved fighting franchise

For fighting game fans, Arc System Works needs no introduction. Its core series, Guilty Gear and Blazblue (which started on PS1 and PS3 respectively), have dominated fighting game tournaments like EVO for years now. On top of that the studio’s produced some impressive franchise-led efforts in the shapes of Persona 4 Arena, Dragon Ball FighterZ, and Granblue Fantasy Versus. Now with Guilty Gear Strive (the “iv” in the title is meant to denote the fourth true iteration of the series) the fighting game studio is taking the genre right back to the drawing board. 
“Over Guilty Gear’s 20-year history, the focus was to make each update more exciting and impactful than the last,” says Daisuke Ishiwatari, the series’ creator and chief creative officer on Guilty Gear Strive. “We tried to tone it down somewhat with Guilty Gear Xrd, but it didn’t address the main issue with the series – the gap in ability between veteran players and those new to the franchise.” 
Arc’s games are known for being fast-paced and technical, with a high skill ceiling, all bright lights and clashing colours that require twitchy reflexes to master. But over the years it’s been working to make fighters friendlier by including more in-depth tutorials and new modes that assist with combos without taking away too much control. 

“The problem was that the ability gap between series veterans and beginners was still too large, even though Guilty Gear Xrd was intended to be a brand-new title. [One thing] we are doing now is taking a hard look at a number of things in order to establish a new baseline for long-time players and newcomers to start from.”
With Strive, Guilty Gear is undergoing a big mechanical overhaul to address its complex nature. “The goal is not to simplify complex mechanics or make the game easier. To excel, players will still need to develop advanced skills and an in-depth understanding of the game,” says Ishiwatari. “Our games have the reputation of being hard to understand from the very beginning.”  
Putting on a show

That said, you still have to put in practice to be able to eke all you can from a character’s moveset. “We are working on making it an entirely new experience for all players,” says Ishiwatari. “However, we intend to make it such that players can still feel elements distinctive to Guilty Gear, such as freedom and the ability to express their individuality through the game.” 
Risc versus reward 

From that point, if a viewer can understand the flow of the game, they might be more encouraged to pick up a pad for themselves. While Strive is aiming to be more approachable, that doesn’t mean it’s being pared down. If anything, it has some more tense back-and-forths than before, with tweaks to the system that force you to focus on countering opponents with your offence rather than running scared. The new RISC system is one way players are pushed forward, with blocks gradually losing effectiveness the more hits you take, meaning you always have to be aware of potential openings. 
The series’ first foray into stage transitions is another way the team is trying to encourage more of that back-and-forth for all players. “In most fighting games, trapping your opponent at the edge of the screen gives you a huge advantage, and one of the most exciting parts of the match is for attacking players to come out with the best result in this moment,” shares Ishiwatari. “However, I feel that there is a huge difference between getting a good combo in and just endlessly trapping someone in the corner. In previous editions of Guilty Gear, there were times when the player on defence had no options. One of the goals for the new title is to break those kinds of deadlocks faster while preserving the concepts of superior execution and challenging gameplay.” 

The stage transitions are part of the way Strive is evolving Guilty Gear visually too. Knock your opponent back and the camera zooms in, spins around, and follows the action. The series has gone from having some of the best pixel art around on PS1 and PS2 to 3D anime- in-motion style in Xrd.
“[In Xrd] the focus was to recreate the feeling and visual impact of Japanese anime,” says Ishiwatari. “For Guilty Gear Strive, we’ve implemented new camera movements not present in the previous version. We’ve also added visual weight to all the characters so they appear more substantial on the screen and expanded the backgrounds to allow the camera more freedom of movement.” 
There’s more of a sense of impact than the sometimes floaty last game had (though many of the characters still dash around at high speed). Pull off a good counter and the camera will zoom in to highlight the clash, while a special move will see it come close to a character, showing off all the detail in their faces. The rockin’ song that introduced the new game was Smell Of The Game (hear it for yourself at bit.ly/opm- strive). Heavy guitar sounds have always gone hand-in-hand with the series. It’s just a part of its nature. That energy is now carrying through everything. 
“What we were aiming for by creating this song was to describe the wild atmosphere of the series,” says Ishiwatari, “[the] excitement of a beginning of a new world, and [to] set our mind not to lose the essential qualities of the game.” We look forward to seeing what the new Guilty Gear brings, and we’re sure other fighting games should be taking note. That’s nothing to feel guilty about.
Looking for the latest information on the PS5 and PS4? Then you’ll want to subscribe to Official PlayStation Magazine to get it delivered straight to your doorstep, and check out Magazines Direct for all of the latest offers. 

#Guilty #Gear #Strive #Arc #System #Works #pushing #evolution #beloved #fighting #franchise


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